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I have an attribute that can have only two value.
What is it better to use?
Pattern?

<xsd:attribute name="sex">
    <xsd:simpleType>
        <xsd:restriction base="xsd:string">
            <xsd:pattern value="male|female" />
        </xsd:restriction>
    </xsd:simpleType>
</xsd:attribute>

Or enumetation?

<xsd:attribute name="sex">
    <xsd:simpleType>
        <xsd:restriction base="xsd:string">
            <xsd:enumeration value="male"></xsd:enumeration>
            <xsd:enumeration value="female"></xsd:enumeration>
        </xsd:restriction>
    </xsd:simpleType>
</xsd:attribute>

If there is not difference, I will use pattern (one line less)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Both are legal XSD, neither seems likely to pose problems for any conforming or even partially conforming implementation of XSD simple types, and I expect it would take huge volumes of data and very precise measurement to detect any speed difference between them. So the question "which is better?" essentially amounts to the question "which one is going to be easier for those who read the schema to understand?"

That's a question only you can answer.

For what it's worth, I'll observe that the formulation using enumeration makes it possible to provide documentation on the meaning or expected usage of each value; it's probably for that reason that I normally use enumerations in cases like this. (The values "male" and "female" seem straightforward enough, but in some schemas an enumeration like this one would also need to include values for "unknown" and "declined-to-state", and users may need guidance on when to use which value.)

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+1 for documentation! –  Christian Hayter Dec 20 '12 at 18:19
    
thanks you for the answer –  Snote Dec 21 '12 at 13:33

well the other thing to note (as far as difference is concerned) is that enumeration can be further encoded. that is to say, you can have an enum with id and value. Where consider that "value" is analgous to what you will expect to see in a typical drop-list. and ID is used to identify the value to the system. So each enum has a ID->Value pairs.

Now consider this, if you use XSLTs to quickly render your xml for a screen, you can write that xslt such that it can parse and set the drop-lists accordingly. Howver, if you use pattern string, you will have difficulty parting it.

Lastly, I have worked with many Application Server technologies (such as WAS/JBOSS, TOMCAT, .NET/C#, ESBs like Tibco, WMB, WPS, WESB, ALBPM, Datapower etc) each one of them has some nuance difference on how they do xml validation. Pay attention to boundry condition validations (null vs blank value vs, no tag, vs tag + xsi:nil=true) to name the few. XML Enumerations also fall into this category for some technologies. They just dont support it well (depending on which tech you are talking about). For example, IN MY EXPERIENCE, I have found that JBOSS 6.0 had issues with validating pattern based restrictions in the schema. (Thats just my experience, I know some JBOSS enthusiast will come along and dispute this, but hey that won't change my exprience now will it ...:)

What I don't like about enums or patterns is that you are now defining your business/system constrains in your schema. Given that you will reuse your schema for evolving architecture, it will result in a lot of rework in the way of updating existing interfaces and WSDLS if one was to add a new allowed value. My solution typically involves doing allowed value validations at the primeter of my solutions. this allows for all of the integration layer to assume that a message that makes its way to integration layer is/must be valid in its content.

I hope this was helpful for someone...

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