Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When i try to create an instance of a class and add this to my arraylist i can't call methods defined in the child.

How do i make this work?

List class:

import java.util.*;
public class List {
  private ArrayList<Person> persons;
  public List(){
    persons = new ArrayList<Person>();
  }
  public void addAssistant(){
    Person person = new Assistant();
    persons.add(person);
    if(person instanceof Assistant){
      person.assist();
    }
  }
}

Person class:

public class Person {
  public Person(){}
}

Assistant class:

public class Assistant extends Person {
  public Assistant(){}
  public void assist(){
     System.out.println("I am assisting!");
  }
}

Compiler: line: person.assist(); within the addAssistant() method in the List class.

Compiler error: The compiler cannot find symbol - method assist().

share|improve this question
    
I wouldn't call a class List, and I would use interfaces –  NimChimpsky Dec 20 '12 at 14:50
    
Not directly related to your problem: You might want to consider if an Assistant IS-A Person, or if it is a role of a Person. –  Mark Rotteveel Dec 20 '12 at 14:50
    
I can but it is a bunch of code, above a simplefied version to keep it easy readable. It goes wrong in the line: person.assist(); within the addAssistant() method in the List class. The compiler cannot find symbol - method assist(). –  rofavadeka Dec 20 '12 at 14:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You need an explicit cast:

if(person instanceof Assistant){
  ((Assistant)person).assist();
}

However, I think this type of logic should generally be discouraged.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I will keep in mind to find another way if i am a bit more used to the java language! It works fine for now. –  rofavadeka Dec 20 '12 at 15:00

You need to make a cast for use a subclass method

if(person instanceof Assistant){
  ((Assistant)person).assist();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your effort, answer allready given. –  rofavadeka Dec 20 '12 at 15:06

Person class does not have assist method defined so you must explicitly cast to Assistant class e.g.

if(person instanceof Assistant){
  ((Assistant)person).assist();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your effort, answer already given. –  rofavadeka Dec 20 '12 at 15:02

You have to cast your Person into an Assistant like this:

if(person instanceof Assistant){
  ((Assistant)person).assist();
}

This type of casting howerver is an indication of flawed application design I think.

Just a sidenote:

You should use interfaces instead of concrete implementations. So you should replace this:

private ArrayList<Person> persons;

with this:

private List<Person> persons;

If you want your Persons to do their specific work and an Assistants work is assisting than you can work around this by creating an abstract method in Person

public abstract void doYourWork();

and you can implement that in Assistant:

@Override
public void doYourWork(){
    // doing something
}

In this case you don't have to explicitly cast your Person objects.

If Person ain't going to have any concrete implementations you can make it an interface instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your indepth explaination. –  rofavadeka Dec 20 '12 at 15:05

The way Java language has been designed, this doesn't compile (as you've figured it out as well). Think of it this way, all assistants are persons, but not all persons are assistants. If you use an explicit cast, you can do what you want to achieve (as NPE mentioned in his answer).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. –  rofavadeka Dec 20 '12 at 15:05

I would code it this way

public void addAssistant(){
    Assistant assistant = new Assistant();
    assistant.add(person);
    assistant.assist();
}

There is no point in abstracting yourself from the knowledge that your recently created object is in fact an Assistant.

Abstracting yourself from the concrete type is a good way of reduce coupling between two pieces of code and it is necessary for doing nice things like polymorphism... but in this particular example you are showing us you are already tightly coupled to an Assistant (in fact you are instantiating it just two lines above).

Another possible way to implement this is to use polymorphism, you can do that by adding the assist() method to the interface of your Person.

public class Person {
  public Person(){}

  public void assist() {
     //I'm a just a person who doesn't assist anywhere
  }
}

By doing so you are going to be able to do what you were trying:

public void addAssistant(){
    Person person = new Assistant();
    persons.add(person);
    person.assist();     
}

However I wouldn't recommend that, mostly because you will start filling your Person interface with responsibilities that are not correctly placed there. It's all matter of design, you need to choose the better (and of course, the most confortable) solution for your particular problem.

Good Luck Claudio

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.