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I have the following PS function:

function GetBuildData {
    [System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection] $conn = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
    [System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand] $cmd = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand
    [System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataAdapter] $adapter = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataAdapter
    [System.Data.DataTable] $dt = New-Object System.Data.DataTable

    try {
        [string] $connStr = "myConnectionString"

        $conn.ConnectionString = $connStr
        $cmd.Connection = $conn
        $cmd.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM TestTable"

        $conn.Open

        $adapter.SelectCommand = $cmd

        $adapter.Fill($dt)

        $conn.Close
    }
    catch [system.exception]
    {
        Write-Host $_
    }
    finally {
        $adapter.Dispose
        $cmd.Dispose
        $conn.Dispose
    }

    return $dt
}

Most of the function has been removed for brevity. The problem I have is when I call the function like so:

[System.Data.DataTable] $buildData = GetBuildData

I get the following error:

Cannot convert the "System.Object[]" value of type "System.Object[]" to type "System.Data.DataTable".

Why does Powershell think that I'm wanting an object[] array returned when it's obvious that the $dt variable is a DataTable?

EDIT:

I've double-checked, and $dt does contain data. For example, the number of Rows.Count is 1 which is expected.

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what line is the error occurring on? the error message should provide the line and character number. I am assuming it happens here: $adapter.Fill($dt) ?? –  D3vtr0n Dec 21 '12 at 16:39
    
Did you ever try the , operator as suggested in jpmc26's answer? I ran into this problem, and that was the solution. –  Adi Inbar Sep 5 '13 at 15:58
    
Did any of the answers solve your problem? If no, could you add some more info about why they didn't work? –  jpmc26 Oct 16 at 17:36
    
Based on the feedback in the comments, I've marked your answer as correct. Apologies for leaving this question abandoned. I happened to move onto other things and never revisited this issue. –  Jason Evans Oct 16 at 18:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't know about the other issues people are bringing up, but the Object[] problem might be that return converts collections of all sorts into Object[]s. Use the , operator to return the unmangled value:

, $dt

(Just ran into this myself yesterday. I can't for the life of me figure out why anyone would think silently converting to Object[] is useful.)

Another possibility is that you have uncaptured output somewhere else in the function. In your case, Fill returns an int. Try adding this to the end of your function calls:

| Out-Null

E.g.,

$adapter.Fill($dt) | Out-Null

If they return values and you're not capturing them, they'll show up in your return value, and since you'll have multiple return values at that point, it would stuff them all into an array.

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1  
That's the answer! Now I can go repair the wall from the damage caused by my head. Ditto on "I can't for the life of me figure out why anyone would think silently converting to Object[] is useful." Maybe Microsoft has a kickback deal with a wall repair contractor? –  Adi Inbar Sep 5 '13 at 15:56
    
BTW, I see that this can be combined with return, i.e. return , $dt also works if you want to return $dt unconverted and end the function right there. –  Adi Inbar Sep 5 '13 at 16:00
    
One more note I'd like to add is that the conversion takes place even if you don't use the return keyword. If the last expression evaluated is $dt alone, the function returns an object array. –  Adi Inbar Sep 5 '13 at 16:10
    
@AdiInbar You're right about return , $dt syntax. I found out later that what the , operator does, when used like this, is put the argument into the array. I think what's happening is that PowerShell sees that we have an array of one element and automatically unwraps it. This works because having PowerShell unwrap the value bypasses the automatic conversion from collection to Object[]. Given that, the return mechanism just works in the usual way: any uncaptured value is returned. That's why it works with or without return. –  jpmc26 Sep 5 '13 at 20:25

You do have a couple of issues in what you posted. Since you explicitly create a DataTable object with New-Object System.Data.DataTable, there is no reason to also coerce it to the DataTable type with [System.Data.DataTable]. The same is true for when you call the function. You are returning a DataTable object, so that is what you will get back. Also if you did want to specify the variable type, there should not be a space between the type identifier and the variable name. Regardless, these issues would not cause the behavior that you are seeing. I ran this code:

function GetBuildData {
    $dt = New-Object System.Data.DataTable
    $column1 = New-Object system.Data.DataColumn 'Col1'
    $column2 = New-Object system.Data.DataColumn 'Col2'
    $dt.columns.add($column1)
    $dt.columns.add($column2)
    $row = $dt.NewRow()
    $row.col1 = '1'
    $row.col2 = '2'
    $dt.rows.add($row)

    return $dt
}

$buildData = GetBuildData
$buildData
Col1                                                                     Col2
----                                                                     ----
1                                                                        2

And it worked just fine. I suspect that the bit that is causing your problem is probably in the bit that you excluded for brevity. Shortcuts rarely are and you rarely get accurate answers from partial data.

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I've added the whole of the function, just in case that gives any clues as to why it's not working for me. –  Jason Evans Dec 20 '12 at 15:23
    
In the function, if you have it output the contents of $dt, does it have data in it? If you do $dt.GetType() in the function, what does it think $dt is? –  EBGreen Dec 20 '12 at 15:26
1  
I would also suggest getting rid of all those type identifiers when you create variables. They are unnecessary and may be causing the issue although I don't think so. –  EBGreen Dec 20 '12 at 15:28
    
@EBGreen If a value of a different type will really cause a failure (as well could be the case if the OP is expecting a DataTable and is getting an Object[]), there's nothing wrong with the type declaration. It serves as a fail early/fast check, which probably made this problem more clear, actually. –  jpmc26 Sep 5 '13 at 22:25

A contributing factor is that you're not actually calling the open and close methods, but referring to them instead. PowerShell is outputting a reference to these methods as well as the datatable (which I imagine isn't actually populated due to the fact that the connection isn't open).

You need to include the parentheses on the open/close methods like this:

$conn.Open()
...
$conn.Close()

You also need to beware of methods which return values (.Add() methods are notorious for this) that you're not consuming either by assigning to a variable or piping to out-null.

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You just have to void out all your dot commands that aren't assigned to variables

function GetBuildData {
    [System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection] $conn = New-Object   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
    [System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand] $cmd = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand
    [System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataAdapter] $adapter = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataAdapter
    [System.Data.DataTable] $dt = New-Object System.Data.DataTable

    try {
        [string] $connStr = "myConnectionString"

        $conn.ConnectionString = $connStr
        $cmd.Connection = $conn
        $cmd.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM TestTable"

        [void]$conn.Open

        $adapter.SelectCommand = $cmd

        $adapter.Fill($dt)

        [void]$conn.Close
    }
    catch [system.exception]
    {
        Write-Host $_
    }
    finally {
         [void]$adapter.Dispose
         [void]$cmd.Dispose
         [void]$conn.Dispose
    }

    $dt
}

As for your question Why? ... Read Keith Hill's Blog: how does return work powershell functions

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