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I have a small MVVM application that communicates with a database. What (if any) is the standard way to perform database transactions in a background thread that updates the UI when complete? Should I use BackgroundWorkers, TPL, or implement my own Threads? Currently I have a static class with the following method for background work:

public static void RunAsync(Action backgroundWork, Action uiWork, Action<Exception> exceptionWork) {

    var uiContext = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();

    // The time consuming work is run on a background thread.
    var backgroundTask = new Task(() => backgroundWork());

    // The UI work is run on the UI thread.
    var uiTask = backgroundTask.ContinueWith(_ => { uiWork(); },
        CancellationToken.None,
        TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion,
        uiContext);

    // Exceptions in the background task are handled on the UI thread.
    var exceptionTask = backgroundTask.ContinueWith(t => { exceptionWork(t.Exception); },
        CancellationToken.None,
        TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted,
        uiContext);

    // Exceptions in the UI task are handled on on the UI thread.
    var uiExceptionTask = uiTask.ContinueWith(t => { exceptionWork(t.Exception); },
        CancellationToken.None,
        TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted,
        uiContext);

    backgroundTask.Start();
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use async/await, which will give you a more natural syntax:

public static async Task RunAsync(Action backgroundWork, Action uiWork, Action<Exception> exceptionWork)
{
  try
  {
    // The time consuming work is run on a background thread.
    await Task.Run(backgroundWork);

    // The UI work is run on the UI thread.
    uiWork();
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    // Exceptions in the background task and UI work are handled on the UI thread.
    exceptionWork(ex);
  }
}

Or better yet, just replace RunAsync with the code itself, so instead of

T[] values;
RunAsync(() => { values = GetDbValues(); }, () => UpdateUi(values), ex => UpdateUi(ex));

You can say:

try
{
  var values = await Task.Run(() => GetDbValues());
  UpdateUi(values);
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
  UpdateUi(ex);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is just what I was looking for! – Matt Dec 20 '12 at 15:44

Well you can use any of these techniques. I would always run them on a separate thread though. The important thing is that the thread action is marshalled back onto the UI thread at the appropriate time. My preference is to use a task or async await if in .net 4.5

share|improve this answer
    
await has the advantage of not blocking a thread while waiting for the async operation. – Servy Dec 20 '12 at 15:03
    
Indeed - good point.. – The Unculled Badger Dec 20 '12 at 15:08

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