Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following in my top class working like a charm:

public class TestA<E extends Test>
{
      List<Vector<E>> list;
      String name, location;

      TestA(String name, String location)
      {
            this.name = name;
            this.location = location;
            list = new ArrayList<Vector<E>>();
      }

      void populate(Test[] arr)
      {
            for(Vector<E> vk : list)
            {
                  // Code here...
            }
      }

}     

class OrderedTest<E extends Test> extends TestA {

      OrderedTest(String name, String location)
      {
            super(name, location);
      }

      void populate(Test[] arr)
      {
            for(Vector<E> vk : list) // ERROR: Cannot convert from element Object to Vector<E>
            {
                  // Code here... 
            }
      }

}

When i try to extend populate() in my subclass i basically want the same method only here i want things ordered so i will pull each Vector in a quicksort method but i dont get any other problems apart from: // ERROR: Cannot convert from element Object to

EDIT: Should i have to implement Iterator for TestA ?

share|improve this question
1  
Why are you using Vectors? –  Adam Arold Dec 20 '12 at 14:56
    
I'm reading a book on Algorithms and Data Structures and just experimenting with what i read. I do understand Vectors are old and dep. –  Sterling Duchess Dec 20 '12 at 14:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

As coded, the two uses of "E" as a generic parameter are independent and disconnected. Vector<E> in one class does not mean the same as Vector<E> in the other.

Change the subclass declaration to:

class OrderedTest<E extends Test> extends TestA<E>

and the E in the superclass declarations is the same E as in OrderedTest.

share|improve this answer
    
Dont i feel stupid now : ) . Thanks a lot mate. –  Sterling Duchess Dec 20 '12 at 14:55

You declared a Generic

class TestA<E> 

defining a field of type List< Vector< E > >, means that the vector will contain elements of type E, that also mean that if you don't define E, when instantiation of subclassing TestA the Vector will be Vector.

The child class also a generic is defined as:

class OrderedTest<E extends Test> extends TestA

defining this generic reusing the letter 'E' doesn't bind it to the father class. That said you didn't define father class E type, and that why it is Object (the default type).

If you want to define the father class generic type to be the same as the child class you must define it as: to

class OrderedTest<E extends Test> extends TestA<E>

note that the letter 'E' here doesn't have any connection with the father 'E' parameter, and can be any letter since where it is a parameter for class OrderedTest, you just decided to use this type parameter to be the one defining the father type parameter also. So you can do for instance:

class OrderedTest<T extends Test> extends TestA<T>

The important thing is to define the father class type property with the one that will be defined to the child, so you can access the list field expecting the same data types.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.