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I use CMake to manage a project with the following layout:

ProjectA/
  include
  doc
  test
ProjectB
  include
  doc
  test

I would like to use CPack to package up a tar.gz source archive with the following layout:

include/
ProjectA/
  doc
  test
ProjectB/
  doc
  test

where the new top-level include contains all include files.

I tried achieving this by running a CMake script through CPACK_INSTALL_SCRIPT, but this script runs before the files are created. Where can I hook into CPack to get that effect?

It also seems that install has no influence on what make package_source does, but it has an effect on make package. Unfortunately make package will also build and package libraries, which is something I don't want to happen. I want a pure source distribution ala make dist.

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It is a bit unclear what the problem is. Like arrowdodger says: You should add an install() call with a DESTINATION and CPack should pick it up and correctly merge the folders. Did you try running 'CPack -G TGZ' directly, or did you use 'make package'? What happens if you specify 'projectA/include/*.h' or perhaps GLOB the sources first? –  Andre Dec 23 '12 at 12:06
    
@Andre As I said: package_source ignores the DESTINATION of install. package honors it, but also tries to compile my libraries, which I don't want. I always tried cmake package and cmake package_source never cpack directly. –  pmr Dec 23 '12 at 12:37
    
And if you accept that 'package' compiles your libraries, does it give you the correct layout? –  Andre Dec 23 '12 at 12:49
    
@Andre Yes, it does. –  pmr Dec 24 '12 at 1:18
    
After answering, I just noticed that you are specifically looking at the source package creation. Please update your question to make this clearer. –  Johannes S. Dec 27 '12 at 10:14
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+300

You can call install(DIRECTORY include DESTINATION include) on headers from both ProjectA and ProjectB and install them into the same dir. This would cause CPack to place them together in the generated package.

Update

Okay, i've managed to do this with CPACK_INSTALL_SCRIPT variable.

I've created following script:

set(CMAKE_SOURCE_DIR @CMAKE_SOURCE_DIR@)

execute_process(COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E copy_directory ${CMAKE_SOURCE_DIR}/A/ ${CMAKE_SOURCE_DIR})
execute_process(COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E copy_directory ${CMAKE_SOURCE_DIR}/B/ ${CMAKE_SOURCE_DIR})
execute_process(COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E remove_directory ${CMAKE_SOURCE_DIR}/A)
execute_process(COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E remove_directory ${CMAKE_SOURCE_DIR}/B)

In the CMakeLists.txt i've populated it with actual value of CMAKE_SOURCE_DIR:

configure_file(CPackScript.cmake CPackScript.cmake @ONLY)

Finally, i've added set(CPACK_INSTALL_SCRIPT ${CMAKE_BINARY_DIR}/CPackScript.cmake) and voila! Generated packages now have include dir with headers from both A/ and B/, while A/ and B/ dirs don't exist.

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I'm already doing that. It is not working. I can't seem to get the DESTINATION option of install to have any effect on tgz creation. I can even reproduce it with a small example case. –  pmr Dec 22 '12 at 19:21
    
Can you show your code? And what's result you are getting? –  arrowdodger Dec 22 '12 at 19:22
    
gist.github.com/4360633 This will result in the same layout with make package_source. –  pmr Dec 22 '12 at 19:34
    
What are you getting in the generated package? Empty include dir? Or there is even no include dir? Could it be that /build*/ ignore pattern clashes with your build dir and it confuses CPack? –  arrowdodger Dec 22 '12 at 19:38
    
I end up with exactly the same layout as in the original. Funnily, if I do a make package the folders are merged, but this also packages up the compiled libraries. All I want is a portable make dist that merges a few directories. –  pmr Dec 22 '12 at 19:41
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I am not sure what excactly is not working for you.

This is what works for me for the ZIP generator on windows. I will try to find a linux machine to see if this works with TGZ as well (EDIT: it does):

Directory structure:

CMakeLists.txt
ProjectA/
    doc
        foo.txt
    include
        foo.h
    test
        foo.test
ProjectB/
    doc
        bar.txt
    include
        bar.h
    test
        bar.test

ProjectA/CMakeLists.txt

project( ProjectA )

INSTALL( DIRECTORY include DESTINATION . )
INSTALL( DIRECTORY doc DESTINATION ${PROJECT_NAME}/ )
INSTALL( DIRECTORY test DESTINATION ${PROJECT_NAME}/ )

ProjectB/CMakeLists.txt

project( ProjectB )

INSTALL( DIRECTORY include DESTINATION . )
INSTALL( DIRECTORY doc DESTINATION ${PROJECT_NAME}/ )
INSTALL( DIRECTORY test DESTINATION ${PROJECT_NAME}/ )

CMakeLists.txt:

project( MyProject )

ADD_SUBDIRECTORY(ProjectA)
ADD_SUBDIRECTORY(ProjectB)

INCLUDE(CPack)

If I create the package, I get

MyProject-0.1.1-win32.zip
    MyProject-0.1.1-win32
        include
            bar.h
            foo.h
        ProjectA
            doc
                foo.txt
            test
                foo.test
        ProjectB
            doc
                bar.txt
            test
                bar.test

Is that what you intended?

Source packages

For source package creation, CPack by default ignores the install commands and installs/copies all directories that are specified in CPACK_SOURCE_INSTALLED_DIRECTORIES. This variable contains pairs of source and destination directories. It defaults to "${CMAKE_SOURCE_DIR};/" if not manually set. To be precise, it globs these directories, ignoring all files in CPACK_SOURCE_IGNORE_FILES which defaults to all major VCS bookkeeping files (see your CPackSourceConfig.cmake for example).

You you could do the following:

CMakeLists.txt

project( MyProject )

SET( PROJECTS ProjectA ProjectB )

SET(CPACK_SOURCE_INSTALLED_DIRECTORIES "${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR};/") 
FOREACH( p ${PROJECTS} ) 
    ADD_SUBDIRECTORY( ${p} )
    LIST( APPEND CPACK_SOURCE_INSTALLED_DIRECTORIES ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR/${p}/include include )
ENDFOREACH()


INCLUDE(CPack)

or add the manipulation to of CPACK_SOURCE_INSTALLED_DIRECTORIES to the respective project files.

However: This will install your include directories to the top-level include directory, but additionally still create another copy inside the project directories due to globbing. You could probably create additional directory-pairs for your doc and test directories and skip the initialization of the CPACK_SOURCE_INSTALLED_DIRECTORIES in the SET command. If you do this, you will need to find a way to install/copy your project-specific CMake files.

BIG CAVEAT: If ProjectAor ProjectB refer to the project-local include directory (eg. with INCLUDE_DIRECTORIES(...) you will break your CMake code, rendering the source installation (partially) useless. So you might want to rethink your idea of the top-level include directory.

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1  
With respect to the local includes: The CMake system is set up to detect if package local or top-level includes are used already. It is just the packaging step I'm trying to change. –  pmr Dec 27 '12 at 15:04
    
I don't understand (might be missing s.th.). If ProjectA's CMakeLists.txt contians include_directories( include ) and s.b. wants to use your source package to build your software, the includes will not be found because they are now in ../include, right? –  Johannes S. Dec 27 '12 at 15:22
    
After finding all packages the build-system checks if top-level includes are present and then sets a global variable with all include directories (including libraries that all projects depend on). This variable is used by the sub-projects to set the include path. –  pmr Dec 27 '12 at 15:46
    
Ah, I see, this is specific to your system. In our setup, we actually use macros that add the project-specific include dirs to those projects that require them. Anyway, am I correct that the only missing part would now be the copying of the project-specific CMakeLists.txt? Or what else is missing in my solution? –  Johannes S. Dec 27 '12 at 16:14
    
I'll give your solution a try tomorrow and let you know. Sorry, Christmas is slowing down things. Bad idea to hand out a bounty during this time. –  pmr Dec 27 '12 at 16:32
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Another possible approach is to completely bypass CPack for the generation of the TGZ archive and simply use a CMake custom target which generates the archive:

project (MyProject)

set (DIST_TEMP_DIR "${CMAKE_BINARY_DIR}/dist")
make_directory(${DIST_TEMP_DIR})

add_custom_target(dist 
    COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E remove_directory "${DIST_TEMP_DIR}/${PROJECT_NAME}/"
    COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E copy_directory "${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/ProjectA/include" "${DIST_TEMP_DIR}/${PROJECT_NAME}/include"
    COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E copy_directory "${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/ProjectA/test" "${DIST_TEMP_DIR}/${PROJECT_NAME}/ProjectA/test"
    COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E copy_directory "${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/ProjectA/doc" "${DIST_TEMP_DIR}/${PROJECT_NAME}/ProjectB/doc"
    COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E copy_directory "${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/ProjectB/include" "${DIST_TEMP_DIR}/${PROJECT_NAME}/include"
    COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E copy_directory "${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/ProjectB/doc" "${DIST_TEMP_DIR}/${PROJECT_NAME}/ProjectA/doc"
    COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E copy_directory "${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/ProjectB/test" "${DIST_TEMP_DIR}/${PROJECT_NAME}/ProjectB/test"
    COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E tar cvz "${CMAKE_BINARY_DIR}/${PROJECT_NAME}.tar.gz"  "${DIST_TEMP_DIR}/${PROJECT_NAME}/"
    COMMENT "Building ${PROJECT_NAME}.tar.gz"
    WORKING_DIRECTORY "${DIST_TEMP_DIR}"
)

The custom target dist first sets up the desired structure of the archive in a temporary directory inside the build folder by invoking CMake in command mode with multiple copy_directory commands. Then it generates the tar.gz archive by using the tar command mode sub-command.

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Yes, unfortunately I need to run more complicated commands including loops so this is not really feasible anymore. Launching another cmake script through the custom target sucks because you cannot load a cache this way. I can of course generate the script with the right variables set, but we are quickly approaching the hack threshold. –  pmr Dec 28 '12 at 20:10
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