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I am still learning Extjs and mvc so I have a design question that I am sure someone can answer for me. My question is:

I have 2 controllers that handle two different views. Either of the two controllers are called to render the correct view based on the type of user. So in my case if the user is admin then they will get the admin view based on credentials and if the person a standard user then they will get the standard view. Should the decision logic be placed in the app.js or should there be another controller that decides which controller to call?

One way I am thinking about:

controller for admin

Ext.define('adminController', {

      // handles admin 
})

controller for standard user

Ext.define('standardController', {

      // handles standard 
})

App.js

   Ext.application({
   name: 'MTK',
   autoCreateViewport: true,

     if(admin) {
       controllers: ['adminController']
     }
     else(std){
       controllers: ['standardController']
     }
});

Another idea:

controller for admin

Ext.define('adminController', {

    // handles admin 
})

controller for standard user

Ext.define('standardController', {

    // handles standard
})

main controller

Ext.define('mainController', {

   if(admin){
      call adminController
   } 
   else(std){
      call standardController
   }
})
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I wouldn't do (or at least too much of it) this in the frontend. I guess you should be able to know the user role the time the user is logging in so.

For me I do it this way, but I must say I have a much more complex ACL and I won't bother a user with modules or views where the backend will refuse any access to.

I am using these two approaches:

  • reload/redirect to the application view (backend!) after a successful login. The server knows what to hand-back by the user session
  • return a configuration after a successful login witch contains information what to require next (this could be just a controller or some more classes)

Both approaches result in less code, faster loading's and easier debugging

I hope this points you in the right direction.

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I already have a login redirect in place. I guess I should have mentioned that already but anyways, I have a session that I obtain ldap information of the user. So I guess I could use another controller to determine which view to render. –  rob Dec 20 '12 at 16:27
    
@rob For sure you could but I would not lay to much decissions concerning user-roles or access into frontend controllers. You should resolve them at serverside and as I said redirect after login a view that get setuped per role or return rolenased information to the login-cmp what to load next –  sra Dec 20 '12 at 16:48
    
thank you for your help –  rob Dec 20 '12 at 20:09
    
@rob you're welcome :) –  sra Dec 20 '12 at 20:46

Interesting question, I agree with @sra that it's not perhaps the right way to do this via client side logic although it's not to say it wouldn't work.

In an app I've been working on we've used the approach of defining all controllers which may or may not be called in a 'nav' style controller. This is the only one we directly instantiate and then based on firstly defaults and then, direct interactions we chose to render appropriate controllers and views which is kind of like the second approach @sra suggested.

I think sra's first approach is sensible in general, but the issue comes when you perhaps have one view which as an admin should be editable and as a user should be read only. You don't want to be writing two views in this situation.

One thing I haven't tried (but this question has made me want to!) is to return either a) a slightly different model based on server side logic, like a 'user' or 'readonlyuser' and pop that into the same view (to save needing two views) or b) to return a more complex model with each data property accompanied with say an 'editable' flag. This could then be used to render different fields, or fields in different modes in the app.....I'm aware this doesn't answer the question, interested in the approach you choose and any findings you care to report though!

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Concerning the one model different output: Actually I am doing this in my first part but that it s a bit complex to start with. But I can tell you it work likes a charm and that out of the box cause it is fully integrated in the ACL –  sra Dec 20 '12 at 20:50
    
From a specific implementation POV, how have you chosen to output the model? Perhaps a model with an 'editable' flag per field which the view responds to? or a selection of properties 'name' (rendered as textbox) and 'readonlyname' (rendered as a display field?) and the view just picks up the fields which it finds? Our most common problem in Ext is rendering views in ro/rw modes and how to cater for that, very interested to see any thoughts on the topic –  dougajmcdonald Dec 20 '12 at 21:11
    
I will try to explain it a bit more detailed: I start with looking at each entity as a module (frontend as backend). That means each has at least it's own backendcontroller (some only have models/stores within the frontend). Beneath the data the controller can also hand back the frontend classes which happens based on the user ACL and is backed by caching system to reduce loadtime. The ACL makes a bit part of it cause it is designed to easily mainatainable by a user (I f.e. need to config nothing). This works for lazy loading and complete app loading. –  sra Dec 21 '12 at 7:40

I think as sra rightly pointed out, let the server send you the right information about the type of user logged in. At the client side let one controller decide which view to render. This should be the same controller handling the login page. CARD VIEW is the layout that you can use in this purpose. after the page is rendered let the other controller take care of the events fired in that view

And any ways controller should not do the render part that is the work of view use the controller only for reacting to the events fired in the view

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