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Below is a code showing tries to encapsulate a logic to re-run something while an exception is being catch.

Does exist patterns or something else to do that ? Or what improvements would you suggest to that code ?

    public static void DoWhileFailing(int triesAmount, int pauseAmongTries, Action codeToTryRun) {
        bool passed = false;
        Exception lastException = null;

        for (int i = 0; !passed && i < triesAmount; i++) {
            try {
                if (i > 0) {
                    Thread.Sleep(pauseAmongTries);
                }
                codeToTryRun();
                passed = true;
            } catch(Exception e) {
                lastException = e;
            }
        }

        if (!passed && lastException != null) {
            throw new Exception(String.Format("Something failed more than {0} times. That is the last exception catched.", triesAmount), lastException);
        }
    }
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3  
Where you have passed = true you could just return and then at the end you wouldn't need to check it, just throw an exception. Some people really hate multiple exit points, others don't. Here I think multiple exit points makes sense. –  Servy Dec 20 '12 at 15:51
    
The "catch(Exception e)" is wronge you should be catching the expection you expect to be able to recover from and checking it's details. E.g. a database exception checking that it is failing due to a deadlock. Otherwise this code is very like what we have apart from clearing the connection cache when we get an exception, as SqlConnection will reuse a broken connection. –  Ian Ringrose Dec 20 '12 at 15:55
    
retry some action you mean? –  Jodrell Dec 20 '12 at 15:58
    
@IanRingrose, maybe just having a generic parameter that specifies which exception to catch before re-run, could be better. Similar to juharr answer, although he suggests to "deliver" the exception to the caller which could via delegate to check the exception. –  Luciano Dec 20 '12 at 16:13
1  
@Luciano, the problem I found is that database deadlocks and cluster fallovers throw the same exception class as "real" database errors. So the exception message text and/or error numbers needed to be processed. –  Ian Ringrose Dec 21 '12 at 12:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I wrote the following code to do basically the same thing. It also lets you specifiy the type of Exception to catch and a Func that determines if the current iteration should throw the exception or continue retrying.

public static void RetryBeforeThrow<T>(
    this Action action, 
    Func<T, int, bool> shouldThrow, 
    int waitTime) where T : Exception
{
    if (action == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("action");
    if (shouldThrow == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("shouldThrow");
    if (waitTime <= 0)
        throw new ArgumentException("Should be greater than zero.", "waitTime");
    int tries = 0;
    do
    {
        try
        {
            action();
            return;
        }
        catch (T ex)
        {
            if (shouldThrow(ex, ++tries))
                throw;
            Thread.Sleep(waitTime);
        }
    }
    while (true);
}

Then you can call it like this

Action a = () => 
    { 
        //do stuff 
    };
a.RetryBeforeThrow<Exception>((e, i) => i >= 5, 1000);

And you can specify any exception type and you can check the exception in the Func to determine if it is an exception that you want to throw or to continue to retry. This gives you the ability to throw your own exceptions in your Action that will stop the retries from occurring.

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I wouldn't use extension method to do that, but the delegate approach to expose the exception is a nice solution. I'll adopt it. Thanks –  Luciano Dec 27 '12 at 15:35

I would re-write this to eliminate a few variables, but in general your code is OK:

public static void DoWhileFailing(int triesAmount, int pauseAmongTries, Action codeToTryRun) {
    if (triesAmount<= 0) {
        throw new ArgumentException("triesAmount");
    }
    Exception ex = null;
    for (int i = 0; i < triesAmount; i++) {
        try {
            codeToTryRun();
            return;
        } catch(Exception e) {
            ex = e;
        }
        Thread.Sleep(pauseAmongTries);
    }
    throw new Exception(String.Format("Something failed more than {0} times. That is the last exception catched.", triesAmount, ex);
}
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I don't see anything wrong with the code, I would just question your assumptions.

A couple of problems that I see:

  • Clients need to understand the failure modes of the called action to choose the right parameters.
  • The action could fail intermittently, which is a capacity killer. Code like this can't scale well.
  • Clients can wait for an indeterminate amount of time for the action to complete.
  • All exceptions but the last will be swallowed, which could hide important diagnostic information.

Depending on your needs, your code might suffice, but for a more robust way to encapsulate an unreliable resource, take a look at the circuit breaker pattern.

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