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I was checking whether installing .NET 4.5 on our build machines changes the output IL image generated by VS 2010.

Since I know the behaviour of foreach has changed in .NET 4.5 to avoid issues due to Access to Modified closure, I chose a simple application that exhibited the behaviour.

  class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var contents = new List<Func<int>>();
            var s = new StringBuilder();

            int[] values = new int[] { 4, 5, 6 };

            foreach (int value in values)
            {
                contents.Add(() => value);
            }

            for (var k = 0; k < contents.Count; k++)
                s.Append(contents[k]());

            Console.WriteLine(s);
        }

VS 2010 output: 666

VS 2012 output: 456

I created a console application in VS 2010 and a console application with the same code in VS 2012 (both targeted .NET 4).

However, both the console applications exhibited different behaviours based on the IDE they were built with. In the build output, I checked that both had nearly similar build arguments. So I was wondering how the end executable exhibited different behaviour? .NET 4.5 is an in-place upgrade, so the compiler for both IDEs must be the same.

NOTE: I did have a look at a related question: Different LINQ Answer in VS 2010 and VS 2012 but it did not answer my question on why the executable behaviour differed.

EDIT 1: As mletterle mentioned, I did try building the code using the commandline in the output window of VS 2010 in a VS 2010 command prompt. The resulting output behaved as if it was built with VS 2012.

EDIT 2:

I am posting the output present in Output Window:

VS 2010: Build started 12/20/2012 11:04:56 PM.

CoreClean: Creating directory "obj\x86\Debug\". GenerateTargetFrameworkMonikerAttribute: Skipping target "GenerateTargetFrameworkMonikerAttribute" because all output files are up-to-date with respect to the input files. CoreCompile:
C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\Csc.exe /noconfig /nowarn:1701,1702 /nostdlib+ /platform:x86 /errorreport:prompt /warn:4 /define:DEBUG;TRACE /errorendlocation /preferreduilang:en-US /highentropyva- /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\Microsoft.CSharp.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\mscorlib.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.Core.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.Data.DataSetExtensions.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.Data.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.Xml.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.Xml.Linq.dll" /debug+ /debug:full /filealign:512 /optimize- /out:obj\x86\Debug\TestConsoleApp.exe /target:exe /utf8output Program.cs Properties\AssemblyInfo.cs "C:\Users\105044960\AppData\Local\Temp.NETFramework,Version=v4.0.AssemblyAttributes.cs" _CopyAppConfigFile: Skipping target "_CopyAppConfigFile" because all output files are up-to-date with respect to the input files. CopyFilesToOutputDirectory: Copying file from "obj\x86\Debug\TestConsoleApp.exe" to "bin\Debug\TestConsoleApp.exe". TestConsoleApp -> C:\Users\105044960\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\Projects\TestConsoleApp\TestConsoleApp\bin\Debug\TestConsoleApp.exe Copying file from "obj\x86\Debug\TestConsoleApp.pdb" to "bin\Debug\TestConsoleApp.pdb".

VS 2012:

1>CoreClean: 1> Deleting file "c:\users\105044960\documents\visual studio 11\Projects\TestConsoleApp\TestConsoleApp\bin\Debug\TestConsoleApp.exe". 1> Deleting file "c:\users\105044960\documents\visual studio 11\Projects\TestConsoleApp\TestConsoleApp\bin\Debug\TestConsoleApp.pdb". 1> Deleting file "c:\users\105044960\documents\visual studio 11\Projects\TestConsoleApp\TestConsoleApp\obj\Debug\TestConsoleApp.csprojResolveAssemblyReference.cache". 1> Deleting file "c:\users\105044960\documents\visual studio 11\Projects\TestConsoleApp\TestConsoleApp\obj\Debug\TestConsoleApp.exe". 1> Deleting file "c:\users\105044960\documents\visual studio 11\Projects\TestConsoleApp\TestConsoleApp\obj\Debug\TestConsoleApp.pdb". 1>GenerateTargetFrameworkMonikerAttribute: 1>Skipping target "GenerateTargetFrameworkMonikerAttribute" because all output files are up-to-date with respect to the input files. 1>CoreCompile: 1> C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\Csc.exe /noconfig /nowarn:1701,1702,2008 /nostdlib+ /platform:AnyCPU /errorreport:prompt /warn:4 /define:DEBUG;TRACE /errorendlocation /preferreduilang:en-US /highentropyva- /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\Microsoft.CSharp.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\mscorlib.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.Core.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.Data.DataSetExtensions.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.Data.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.Xml.dll" /reference:"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0\System.Xml.Linq.dll" /debug+ /debug:full /filealign:512 /optimize- /out:obj\Debug\TestConsoleApp.exe /target:exe /utf8output Program.cs Properties\AssemblyInfo.cs "C:\Users\105044960\AppData\Local\Temp.NETFramework,Version=v4.0.AssemblyAttributes.cs" 1>CopyFilesToOutputDirectory: 1> Copying file from "obj\Debug\TestConsoleApp.exe" to "bin\Debug\TestConsoleApp.exe". 1> TestConsoleApp -> C:\Users\105044960\Documents\Visual Studio 11\Projects\TestConsoleApp\TestConsoleApp\bin\Debug\TestConsoleApp.exe 1> Copying file from "obj\Debug\TestConsoleApp.pdb" to "bin\Debug\TestConsoleApp.pdb".

share|improve this question
    
What is the different behavior each exhibits? –  Andrew Barber Dec 20 '12 at 17:07
    
Er, why exactly are you surprised? You linked to a blog post explaining the different behavior... –  jalf Dec 20 '12 at 17:20
2  
So why don't you think this explains it? –  jalf Dec 20 '12 at 17:24
1  
@GaneshR. but again, isn't that explained in the answer you linked to (and which again links to this? It is changed because there has been a change in how the compiler implements the foreach loop. Maybe I'm missing something, but looks like you already have the answer to your question –  jalf Dec 20 '12 at 17:29
1  
@jalf - The change is connect to C# 5.0 not the .NET Framework itself. –  Ramhound Dec 20 '12 at 18:30
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Visual Studio uses an in-process compiler, so it knows which version of C# it's using.

As you noted, csc.exe from the command line, on the other hand, uses whatever C# version it's made to compile, so in your case it'll be C# 5.0. Since it's an in-place upgrade (in terms of installation directory), it might break code that relied on the foreach binding being the same across the whole loop (odd, but possible).


NOTE: Old answer for the wrong question: the OP knows this and was testing it from the command line.

The blog post you link to already answers your question. I think this question is related to this one.

It's the compiler that changed, so this:

foreach (int value in values)
{
    // ...
}

used to generate something along the following code:

{
    int value;
    for (/* iteration */)
    {
        value = /* get from enumerator */;
        // ...
    }
}

while the new C# compiler now generates the equivalent of moving the variable to inside the loop:

for (/* iteration */)
{
    int value = /* get from enumerator */;
    // ...
}

This makes a great difference, since closures within the // ... will capture a new value binding in each cycle, instead of sharing the same value binding that used to be declared outside the loop.

The catch is, if you want your code to work correctly for both older and newer compilers, you must declare your own variable inside the foreach loop:

foreach (int value in values)
{
    int newValue = value;
    // ...
}

The current C# 4.0 specification in Visual Studio 2010 says:

(...) A foreach statement of the form

foreach (V v in x) embedded-statement

is then expanded to:

{
  E e = ((C)(x)).GetEnumerator();
  try {
      V v;
      while (e.MoveNext()) {
          v = (V)(T)e.Current;
          embedded-statement
      }
  }
  finally {
      … // Dispose e
  }
}

The C# 5.0 specification in Visual Studio 2012 says:

(...) A foreach statement of the form

foreach (V v in x) embedded-statement

is then expanded to:

{
  E e = ((C)(x)).GetEnumerator();
  try {
      while (e.MoveNext()) {
          V v = (V)(T)e.Current;
          embedded-statement
      }
  }
  finally {
      … // Dispose e
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why was this correct answer downvoted? –  Ramhound Dec 20 '12 at 19:34
2  
It's a correct answer for the wrong question. –  Robert P Dec 20 '12 at 22:16
    
@RobertP, indeed, now I see the real question, and I see you edited your answer. I'll edit mine too. –  Paulo Madeira Dec 21 '12 at 9:41
    
@PauloMadeira It seems that what they did in VS 2005 / 2008 still holds true. Thanks for the answer by the way. –  Ganesh R. Jan 3 '13 at 16:51
add comment

Note: I removed much of my original response. It was answering the wrong question. A better response follows.

Ah, now I see what you're asking: "How does Visual Studio 2010 know to compile to C# 4 instead of C# 5 after .NET 4.5 is installed, even Visual Studio 2010 and Visual Studio 2012 use the same csc.exe and pass the same options to it?"

@mletterle But .NET 4.5 is an in place upgrade to .NET 4. So really there is only .NET 4 present on my machine. The only possibility is that the IDE has stashed away a hidden copy of .NET 4 compiler that I cannot see.

I'm not sure where you heard that or why you assumed that. .NET 4.5 is NOT an in-place upgrade. It is a different version of the tool. There will be differences. This is one of them.

Update 1:

Looks like we were using a different definition of "in-place" upgrade. My usage of "in-place" is "an upgrade that should have no discernible differences between versions." The definition given in the article you linked to uses it in a different way: "in place" in their usage is "uses the same CLR, but adds new libraries."

Since C# 5 is different than C# 4, that change is NOT "in place" in the usage I'm familiar with.

As a result, the difference is not the CLR you're targeting, but the language version you're using - the CLR is an "in place" upgrade (both the 4.0 CLR), but the language is not (C# 4 in VS2010, C#5 in VS2012.)

Update 2:

Within the .csproj file (which is actually an msbuild file managed by Visual Studio), there is an attribute that specifies the target framework. Projects made with Visual Studio 2012 have this by default:

<TargetFrameworkVersion>v4.5</TargetFrameworkVersion>

Whereas projects in Visual Studio 2010 that target Version 4 look like:

<TargetFrameworkVersion>v4.0</TargetFrameworkVersion>

This tells Visual Studio to set up the environment when building for one or the other target framework. While it looks like csc.exe is being invoked directly from a command prompt, it really isn't: the msbuild project is actually what's being processed, and it's happening in "Visual Studio"'s custom process environment.

I can only assume the specifics of what's happening, but likely after the upgrade, having the "TargetFrameworkVersion" attribute set to v4.0 returns the environment to v4.0 during the compilation of a project targeting v4.0. On the other hand, by invoking csc.exe from the command line without the environment set up by msbuild, it uses the "defaults" for its version (which is now defaulting to C# 5) giving you the new C# 5 behavior even though you're using the VS 2010 command prompt. When you invoke the build via MSBuild, though, it knows how to return to the original C# 4 environment for the duration of the build (since MSBuild is part of the .NET tool chain, too.)

share|improve this answer
2  
.NET 4.5 is an in place upgrade to .NET 4. Please refer to hanselman.com/blog/… Also I understand in what way the compiler behaviour has changed. My question is why is it differing when I use different versions of IDE when the underlying Framework components are the same –  Ganesh R. Dec 20 '12 at 18:20
    
@GaneshR. - While Robert is 100% correct in his answer this a change with C# more so then the compiler itself. The same compiler is used only updated and new assemblies are offered in the case of .NET 4.5 –  Ramhound Dec 20 '12 at 18:31
1  
Yes, yes, this explains why when csc.exe is compiling C#5 code it does what it does. What it does NOT do is explain how csc.exe knows that it is compiling C#4 code when being called within VS2010, that's the root of the OP's question. –  mletterle Dec 20 '12 at 18:39
2  
@Ramhound This doesn't explain how when handing a text file to csc.exe it knows which syntax is being used, especially when there are no differences in content as in the OP. –  mletterle Dec 20 '12 at 19:15
2  
@Ramhound The same csc.exe executable, located in the same place on disk, is used by VS2010 and VS2012 for compiling different C# versions, with no obvious command arguments that cause this. The fundamental disconnect is that people think the CSharp compiler is separate from the .NET Framework, it IS NOT. The CSC compiler is installed along with the .NET Framework in %SYSTEMDIR%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\[Version]. Installing .NET 4.5 on top of .NET 4.0 replaces it. –  mletterle Dec 20 '12 at 19:31
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