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I want to define a macro function which support at the same time:

1) No input parameter

2) Input parameters

some thing like that:

#define MACRO_TEST(X)\
    printf("this is a test\n");\
    printf("%d\n",x) // the last printf should not executed if there is no input parameter when calling the macro

In the main:

int main()
{
    MACRO_TEST(); // This should display only the first printf in the macro
    MACRO_TEST(5); // This should display both printf in the macro
}
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1  
You can't do that. In which context do you need such polymorphism on Macro? –  greydet Dec 20 '12 at 17:05
    
Can't you just use a variadic function? Or at the very least put an if in the macro? –  netcoder Dec 20 '12 at 17:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use sizeof for this purpose.

Consider something like this:

#define MACRO_TEST(X) { \
  int args[] = {X}; \
  printf("this is a test\n");\
  if(sizeof(args) > 0) \
    printf("%d\n",*args); \
}

The following macro function support the input parameter behavior of printf and support also no input parameter:

#define MACRO_TEST(MESSAGE,args...) { \
  const char *A[] = {MESSAGE}; \
  printf("this is a test\n");\
  if(sizeof(A) > 0) \
    printf(*A,##args); \
}
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1  
Oh, I had not thought about a temporary array. That's smart! –  cmc Dec 20 '12 at 17:25
    
And please, put it in do { } while (0)! –  Shahbaz Dec 20 '12 at 17:27
    
Keep in mind that this is not portable. ISO C (e.g.: with -pedantic compiler flag) forbids both empty initializer lists and zero-size arrays (both will occur if no argument is passed to the macro), although it is supported by GNU extensions. –  netcoder Dec 20 '12 at 18:21
    
Good answer, Thank you –  MOHAMED Dec 21 '12 at 8:48
    
I updated your answer in order to support another kind of input behaviour –  MOHAMED Dec 21 '12 at 8:50

gcc and recent versions of MS compilers support variadic macros - that is macros that work similar to printf.

gcc documentation here: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Variadic-Macros.html

Microsoft documentation here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177415(v=vs.80).aspx

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The C99 standard says,

An identifier currently defined as an object-like macro shall not be redefined by another #define reprocessing directive unless the second definition is an object-like macro definition and the two replacement lists are identical. Likewise, an identifier currently defined as a function-like macro shall not be redefined by another #define preprocessing directive unless the second definition is a function-like macro definition that has the same number and spelling of parameters, and the two replacement lists are identical.

I think compiler prompts a warning of redefined MACRO. Hence it is not possible.

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Not exactly that but ...

#include <stdio.h>

#define MTEST_
#define MTEST__(x) printf("%d\n",x)
#define MACRO_TEST(x)\
    printf("this is a test\n");\
    MTEST_##x    

int main(void)
{
    MACRO_TEST();
    MACRO_TEST(_(5));
    return 0;
}

EDIT

And if 0 can be used as skip:

#include <stdio.h>

#define MACRO_TEST(x) \
    do { \
        printf("this is a test\n"); \
        if (x +0) printf("%d\n", x +0); \
    } while(0)

int main(void)
{
    MACRO_TEST();
    MACRO_TEST(5);
    return 0;
}
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Thak you for the answer –  MOHAMED Dec 21 '12 at 8:59
    
You're welcome ;) –  Alter Mann Dec 21 '12 at 9:24

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