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Should last statement be return in and non void return types method? But this is still working.

public String test()
{
    try
    {
        // Do my work
        return "myValue";
    }
    finally
    {
        System.out.println("I'm in Finally");
    }
}

I'm bit lack of knowledge to understand how this work. Could someone explain me.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is no problem with this code, because every possible path through it inevitably leads to a return statement*. It does not have to be the last statement textually, as long as it is the last statement logically (Java compiler is smart enough to figure out if it's so, and give you an error if there are paths through your code that do not return a value or throw an exception). The fact that there will be code executing after hitting the return (i.e. your finally block) does not change anything: as far as the compiler is concerned, your function has provided a return value before exiting the function.

* In fact, there is only one path through your function's code, and it terminates at the return statement.

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return a value or throw an error. –  Sam Dec 20 '12 at 17:07
1  
@SamWard Absolutely - thank you very much for the correction! –  dasblinkenlight Dec 20 '12 at 17:08
    
The fun part is when you add a catch and don't rethrow. Then things get a bit more interesting :-) (See my answer: stackoverflow.com/a/13977143/129655) –  Platinum Azure Dec 20 '12 at 17:12
    
@PlatinumAzure Well, that would create another path through your code, which must be covered. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 20 '12 at 17:16
    
@dasblinkenlight Yup, that's the point. I'm just trying to help you explore the question from another angle :-) –  Platinum Azure Dec 20 '12 at 17:19

It is sufficient in Java to make sure that all possible code paths either return a value or throw an exception. For example, the following code is valid:

public boolean test() {
    if (3 < 5) {
        return true;
    } else {
        throw new RuntimeException("Holy crap!");
    }
}

In your example, your try block ends with a return, so the happy path is covered and there is no need for code beyond the finally; in addition, any exceptions thrown in the try will propagate out of the method and will have no chance to reach the end of the method, so all possible paths will never hit the section under the finally block and no return statement is needed. (In fact, a compiler may give you a warning or error about unreachable code if you added a return statement at the bottom!)

Things change when you add a catch clause, because now it's possible for code to flow beyond the try/catch/finally block:

public String test(){
    try{

        // Do my work

        return "myValue";

    }
    catch (Exception ex) {
        System.out.println("O noes something went wrong");
        // swallow exception
    }
    finally {
        System.out.println("I'm in Finally");
    }

    // Oh no! If an exception was caught, code can actually flow through here.
    // Compiler will complain about a missing return statement until you add one.
    // return "someOtherValue";
}
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In this case try and finally always execute. So, it doesn't matter where is return

public String myfun(){

return "here";
}

or

public String myfun(){
    try{
    return "here";
     }finally{
     //will execute always
    }
    }

Are almost same. When, you see the flow of program. But, if there would be any conditional like

 public String myfun(){
  if(x==1){
  return "here";
  }
  else{
  // something here 
  }
  }

In this case, it will raise error. Since, either any of the block will execute not both. Same as

public String fun(){
try{
return "here";
}
catch(Exception e){
//catch implementation without return
}
}
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1  
That's not a very clear answer. Add a single catch clause that doesn't rethrow, for example: what happens then? –  Platinum Azure Dec 20 '12 at 17:09
    
@PlatinumAzure just wait for few minutes. –  jWeaver Dec 20 '12 at 17:14
    
@PlatinumAzure Now, check my answer and let me know. –  jWeaver Dec 20 '12 at 17:19
1  
Looks better, though it could still use some editing for code indentation and/or clarity. I wasn't aware you were going to edit earlier, so I apologize if my first comment was too quick. –  Platinum Azure Dec 20 '12 at 17:20

The key JLS concept for this is Normal and Abrupt Completion of Statements, combined with the behavior of try-finally.

The try block completes abruptly because of the return of "myValue". The finally block completes normally, so the whole try statement completes abruptly due to the same cause as the try block, return of "myValue".

In effect, the last statement in the method, the try statement, is one that returns a String.

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