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I'm trying to solve the following problem using Mathematica:

What is the smallest positive integer not obtainable from the set {2,3,4,5,6,7,8} via arithmetic operations {+,-,*,/}, exponentiation, and parentheses. Each number in the set must be used exactly once. Unary operations are NOT allowed (1 cannot be converted to -1 with without using a 0, for example).

For example, the number 1073741824000000000000000 is obtainable via (((3+2)*(5+4))/6)^(8+7).

I am a beginner with Mathematica. I have written code that I believe solves the problems for the set {2,3,4,5,6,7} (I obtained 2249 as my answer), but my code is not efficient enough to work with the set {2,3,4,5,6,7,8}. (My code already takes 71 seconds to run on the set {2,3,4,5,6,7})

I would very much appreciate any tips or solutions to solving this harder problem with Mathematica, or general insights as to how I could speed my existing code.

My existing code uses a brute force, recursive approach:

(* this defines combinations for a set of 1 number as the set of that 1 number *)

combinations[list_ /; Length[list] == 1] := list

(* this tests whether it's ok to exponentiate two numbers including (somewhat) arbitrary restrictions to prevent overflow *)

oktoexponent[number1_, number2_] :=

 If[number1 == 0, number2 >= 0,
  If[number1 < 0,
   (-number1)^number2 < 10000 \[And] IntegerQ[number2],
   number1^number2 < 10000 \[And] IntegerQ[number2]]]

(* this takes a list and removes fractions with denominators greater than 100000 *)

cleanup[list_] := Select[list, Denominator[#] < 100000 &]

(* this defines combinations for a set of 2 numbers - and returns a set of all possible numbers obtained via applications of + - * / filtered by oktoexponent and cleanup rules *)

combinations[list_ /; Length[list] == 2 && Depth[list] == 2] :=
  cleanup[DeleteCases[#, Null] &@DeleteDuplicates@
    {list[[1]] + list[[2]],
     list[[1]] - list[[2]],
     list[[2]] - list[[1]],
     list[[1]]*list[[2]],
     If[oktoexponent[list[[1]], list[[2]]], list[[1]]^list[[2]],],
     If[oktoexponent[list[[2]], list[[1]]], list[[2]]^list[[1]],],
     If[list[[2]] != 0, list[[1]]/list[[2]],],
     If[list[[1]] != 0, list[[2]]/list[[1]],]}]

(* this extends combinations to work with sets of sets *)

combinations[
  list_ /; Length[list] == 2 && Depth[list] == 3] := 
 Module[{m, n, list1, list2},
  list1 = list[[1]];
  list2 = list[[2]];
  m = Length[list1]; n = Length[list2];
  cleanup[
   DeleteDuplicates@
    Flatten@Table[
      combinations[{list1[[i]], list2[[j]]}], {i, m}, {j, n}]]]

(* for a given set, partition returns the set of all partitions into two non-empty subsets *)

partition[list_] := Module[{subsets},
  subsets = Select[Subsets[list], # != {} && # != list &]; 
  DeleteDuplicates@
   Table[Sort@{subsets[[i]], Complement[list, subsets[[i]]]}, {i, 
     Length[subsets]}]]

(* this finally extends combinations to work with sets of any size *)

combinations[list_ /; Length[list] > 2] := 
 Module[{partitions, k},
  partitions = partition[list];
  k = Length[partitions]; 
  cleanup[Sort@
    DeleteDuplicates@
     Flatten@(combinations /@ 
        Table[{combinations[partitions[[i]][[1]]], 
          combinations[partitions[[i]][[2]]]}, {i, k}])]]

Timing[desiredset = combinations[{2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7}];]

{71.5454, Null}

Complement[
   Range[1, 3000], #] &@(Cases[#, x_Integer /; x > 0 && x <= 3000] &@
   desiredset)

{2249, 2258, 2327, 2509, 2517, 2654, 2789, 2817, 2841, 2857, 2990, 2998}
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2  
Well, if you showed us your code rather than a rough sketch of it, some of us would cut and paste and fiddle around. –  High Performance Mark Dec 20 '12 at 17:13
1  
Somehow this sounds like a school assignment.. –  Jari Komppa Dec 20 '12 at 17:17
    
I'll post my code now - didn't post initially, just because I know I'm a beginner, and anticipate that optimal code would need to be wholly rewritten. Jari, don't quite know what to say - it's not - I'm trying to learn Mathematica and have been going through the problems at Project Euler as a way of doing so. This was a problem I'd personally set for myself in the same vein. –  Royce Dec 20 '12 at 17:36
    
I answered a similar question here stackoverflow.com/a/3948113/353410 –  belisarius Dec 22 '12 at 18:00
1  
@Royce, to confirm, this isn't a projecteuler.net problem, correct? In other words, you know of no online solution to this problem? My thoughts: I don't think you can safely throw away large intermediate results (overflows), since they might become small again. I would suggest a symbolic approach (not necessarily using Mathematica) where you simplify the symbols each round (ie, "2*3" and "3*2" are identical). –  barrycarter Jan 20 '13 at 4:57
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1 Answer

This is unhelpful, but I'm under my quota for useless babbling today:

(* it turns out the symbolizing + * is not that useful after all *) 
f[x_,y_] = x+y 
fm[x_,y_] = x-y 
g[x_,y_] = x*y 
gd[x_,y_] = x/y 

(* power properties *) 
h[h[a_,b_],c_] = h[a,b*c] 
h[a_/b_,n_] = h[a,n]/h[b,n] 
h[1,n_] = 1 

(* expand simple powers only! *) 
(* does this make things worse? *) 
h[a_,2] = a*a 
h[a_,3] = a*a*a 

(* all symbols for two numbers *) 
allsyms[x_,y_] := allsyms[x,y] =  
 DeleteDuplicates[Flatten[{f[x,y], fm[x,y], fm[y,x],  
 g[x,y], gd[x,y], gd[y,x], h[x,y], h[y,x]}]] 

allsymops[s_,t_] := allsymops[s,t] =  
 DeleteDuplicates[Flatten[Outer[allsyms[#1,#2]&,s,t]]] 

Clear[reach]; 
reach[{}] = {} 
reach[{n_}] := reach[n] = {n} 
reach[s_] := reach[s] = DeleteDuplicates[Flatten[ 
 Table[allsymops[reach[i],reach[Complement[s,i]]],  
  {i,Complement[Subsets[s],{ {},s}]}]]] 

The general idea here is to avoid calculating powers (which are expensive and non-commutative), while at the same time using the commutativity/associativity of addition/multiplication to reduce the cardinality of reach[].

Code above also available at:

https://github.com/barrycarter/bcapps/blob/master/playground.m#L20

along with literally gigabytes of other useless code, data, and humor.

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