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Before asking how, I might first ask if it is possible.

So, is it possible to persist only some columns of a table among all columns of the table which are actually mapped, on SQLAlchemy?

Indeed, in my table, I have one column which is computed by the database and it should not be modified by database users. I actually revoked the privilege to do so.

My problem is that SQLAlchemy is trying to insert values on every columns :

INSERT INTO mytable (data_1, data_2, ..., data_n, computed_data) VALUES ...

Instead, I would like it to do this :

INSERT INTO mytable (data_1, data_2, ..., data_n) VALUES ...

Does anyone know if it is possible? And if yes, how to configure this behavior?

Thanks

2012-12-21: Edit

Here is my configuration :

_mytable = Table('mytable', Base.metadata,
    Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
    Column('somedata', String),
    Column('protecteddata', String),
)

class MyObject(Base):
    __table__ = _mytable
    _id = _mytable.c.id

    def __init__(self, somedata):
        self.somedata = somedata

I am talking about INSERTs using the ORM. When I don't provide any value for 'protecteddata', SQLAlchemy seems to provide None for my 'protecteddata' when I commit.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

there's detail missing here, including the Table metadata and/or declarative configuration, and whether we're talking about a core insert() construct being used directly or we're using the ORM. The short answer is SQLAlchemy only provides values in an INSERT statement for those columns for which you provide a value, either within the passed parameters, or configured as a Python- or SQL-side default on the Column object.

If you don't provide any value, and the Column is not configured to have a SQLAlchemy-fired default, the column won't be in the VALUES clause of the INSERT statement. This general idea applies to the core insert() construct.

The ORM, which itself makes use of the insert() construct to emit the INSERT, does tend to be a bit more eager about providing a value for a Column that hasn't been assigned to, assuming it is mapped. The FetchedValue construct is used to indicate to the ORM that a particular column should be fetched to get its value: http://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/rel_0_8/core/schema.html#triggered-columns

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My conf: _mytable = Table('mytable', Base.metadata, Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True), Column('somedata', String), Column('protecteddata', String), ) class MyObject(Base): table = _mytable _id = _mytable.c.id def __init__(self, somedata): self.somedata = somedata I was talking about INSERTs using the ORM. When I don't provide any value for 'protecteddata', SQLAlchemy seems to provide None for my 'protecteddata' when I commit. Anyway, the FetchedValue construct is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks –  user1919510 Dec 21 '12 at 8:38

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