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I'm using git-svn, and I'm trying to run git svn rebase.

I get the error:

Your local changes to the following files would be overwritten by checkout:
<filename>
Please, commit your changes or stash them before you can switch branches.

I have previously run git update-index --assume-unchanged <filename>, and made changes to the file, but I've now run git update-index --no-assume-unchanged <filename> to get rid of that.

git status doesn't report any changes and git stash says there's nothing to stash.

I have checked that the file is not in .gitignore or .git/info/exclude

How can I debug this problem further?

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3 Answers 3

I was having this problem and Tim's answer helped me figure out the solution.

In the past I had run:

git update-index --assume-unchanged index.php

The Problem

After making a bunch of changes to another branch remotely, I was getting the overwrite warning while trying to switch over locally.

git checkout other-branch

error: Your local changes to the following files would be overwritten by checkout:
index.php
Please, commit your changes or stash them before you can switch branches.
Aborting

Stashing wasn't working.

git stash save --keep-index
No local changes to save

The Solution

git update-index --no-assume-unchanged index.php
git add index.php
git commit

After that.

git checkout other-branch

Success!

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Thanks for your post. In my case something similar happened whereby I modified the file, then I did the git update --assume-unchanged that resulted in this error. I had to follow your solution by doing the --no-assume-unchanged, commit, and then thereafter --assume-unchanged. Only push thereafter –  Christo Smal Sep 12 '13 at 11:47
up vote 7 down vote accepted

It turns out that I had the skip-worktree bit set, so I needed to run

git update-index --no-skip-worktree <filename>

I found this out by running

git ls-files -v | grep "^[^H]"

(Or git ls-files -v | where { $_ -match "^[^H]"} with Windows Powershell)

Typing git help ls-files explained what the output meant.

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git reset --hard 

Will also work but may cause you to lose changes.

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No, that won't work for the skip-worktree bit. See fallengamer.livejournal.com/93321.html –  Tim Bellis Jan 3 '13 at 9:49

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