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I'm following a pseudocode snippet in a CompSci paper and trying to implement it in C. In this paper, I have two structs, say A and B. One of them goes something like this:

struct A {
  B* next;
  int data;
}

while B looks like

struct B {
  A* next;
}

Now, for a given instantiation a of A and b of B, at some point the algorithm tells me to do two things:

  • if a is not B, then do stuff,
  • a = b

Now, I cannot do reflection in C, and I will obviously get incompatible pointer types for the second requirement. I thought about having a union in the A struct, and perhaps that would help, but I'd like to ask you guys if there's a good design I'm missing.

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3  
Are you certain it isn't a.next = b ? – Zan Lynx Dec 20 '12 at 18:02
2  
Not sure I understand this. a should never be b because they are of different types... If at some point A* a == (A*)b then dereferencing a would be UB. – netcoder Dec 20 '12 at 18:02
    
@ZanLynx: I am. It's somehow "swapping" the objects. – Dervin Thunk Dec 20 '12 at 18:09
    
@netcoder: you may be right for the second point (there are no types in the pseudocode, so I may have got that wrong, will check again). I'm still left with the first problem though. – Dervin Thunk Dec 20 '12 at 18:11
1  
I'm not sure, but he could create a structure that works as a wrapper, wrapping a structure of type A or B with a void pointer, with another additional field of type char representing the type.Would this break the strict aliasing rule? – Ramy Al Zuhouri Dec 20 '12 at 18:17
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are venturing into dangerous territory here. It appears that you are trying to implement polymorphism in a language which has no built in support for it.

There are several schemes you could use which allow you to have an struct A* actually point to memory containing a struct B. A union is probably the least dangerous. But as you point out, there is no reflection. Any pointer only knows that it points to a block of memory, and one way to interpret that block if it is dereferenced. void pointers don't even know that last part. The only way to do type identification is to insert a value identifying the type somewhere in the structure.

Something like this:

struct generic {
   enum {ATYPE,BTYPE} type;
   union {
      struct A a;
      struct B b;
    };
};


function process(struct generic* a, struct generic* b)
{
   if (a.type != BTYPE)
   { //do stuff 
   }
   else 
   { 
      *a = *b;
   }
}

-edit-
on the other hand, if the content of the structures is as simple as you describe, you could simply add an isB member to struct a, and only use one type.

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I have no idea what this is supposed to do, but here is what you do to make it compile:

struct a a;
struct b b;

typedef struct a
{
  struct b* next;
  int data;
} A;

typedef struct b
{
  A* next;
} B;

int main()
{
  A a;
  B b;
}
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Now, if your struct's are defined in the correct way, then your algorithm should be described that way:

  • if (a != b->next) then do stuff
  • a=b->next;

But in this case, the assignment of a=b->next makes only sense if a!=b->next, so it should be moved into the "do stuff"-thing

To make it compilable, you just can add a forward-decl to B in front of the A-definition:

struct B;
struct A {
  B* next;
  int data;
};
struct B {
  A* next;
};
int main () {
  A *a=...;
  B *b=...;
  if (a!=b->next) {
    //do stuff
  }
  a = b->next;
}
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