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I came across the expression 'subclasses of the containing class' when I read a paper. What does that containing class mean in Java? This is the excerpt from the paper.

Primarily, this entailed three things: (i) studying the implementation of the entity, as well as its usage, to reason about the intent behind the functionality; (ii) performing static dependency analysis on the entity, and any other types, methods, or fields referenced by it, including constants; and (iii) examining the inheritance hierarchy and subclasses of the containing class. This approach took considerable time and effort to apply.

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Subclass of the containing class of which element? The context should clarify the element. –  reprogrammer Dec 20 '12 at 18:06
1  
It would help if you posted more context of the original quote. "Containing" is a fairly broad term. –  Aaron Kurtzhals Dec 20 '12 at 18:08
    
Could you please post the part that you read in that paper. –  Mike JM Dec 20 '12 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This example has a subclass of the containing class:

class Parent {
    class Child {
    }
}

class ParentSubclass extends Parent {
    void whatever() {
        new Child(); // Creates an instance of Parent.Child
    }
}

ParentSubclass is a subclass of the containing class of Child. Note that outside of Parent (or its subclasses), new Child() will not work, as you need to have a containing ("outer") class to instantiate a non-static "inner" class.

Things get a bit crazy when you now add a method doSomething to Parent, invoke it in Child but override it in ParentSubclass.

class Parent {
    void doSomething() {
        System.out.println("Not doing anything");
    }

    class Child {
        void whatever() {
            doSomething(); // actually: Parent.this.doSomething()
        }
    }
}

class ParentSubclass extends Parent {
    void doSomething() {
        System.out.println("I'm just slacking.");
    }

    void whatever() {
        Child a = new Child(); // Creates an instance of Parent.Child
        a.whatever(); // will print "I'm just slacking".
    }
}

Situations like this make static code analysis a quite hard problem.

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Since I have no access to the paper, this is my best guess: in Java, classes can be related to each other in more than one way: in addition to inheriting from one another, classes can also be nested inside one another.

Here is an example of a class inheriting from the class inside which it is nested:

public class Outer {
    public void doSomething() {
        // ...does something
    }
    private static class Inner extends Outer {
        public void doSomething() {
            // ...does something else
        }
    }
}

In the example above, Inner inherits from Outer, which serves as its containing class.

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static inner classes are not truly nested. They might just as well just be in the same package for all practical purposes. And why is the extends Outer needed? –  Anony-Mousse Dec 20 '12 at 18:15
    
@Anony-Mousse Well, nested static classes do gain access to elements of their outer classes that are declared private, as opposed to package-private elements accessible to other top-level classes sharing the same package. The extends Outer is there to make a class that is both nested and inheriting at the same time. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 20 '12 at 18:18

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