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I currently have an existing model, Document, that needs a new, auto-incrementing column. Unfortunately, I am getting errors during the migrate.

The steps I have taken are:

ruby script/generate migration add_index_column_to_Document

which properly generated the empty .rb titled

20121220182429_add_index_column_to_document.rb

Next, I edited the file to look like:

class AddIndexColumnToDocument < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    execute 'ALTER TABLE documents ADD index INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY'
  end

  def self.down
    execute 'ALTER TABLE documents DROP index'
  end
end

Then I executed the migration with rake db:migrate and got the following error:

==  AddIndexColumnToDocument: migrating =======================================
-- execute("ALTER TABLE documents ADD index INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY")
rake aborted!
An error has occurred, all later migrations canceled:

Mysql::Error: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY' at line 1: ALTER TABLE documents ADD index INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY

The MySQL version, according to apt-cache show mysql-server is: 5.5.28-0ubuntu0.12.04.2

Unfortunately for me, my SQL code matches that of all examples I can find online, so I am unsure as to why it is not working. Thanks in advance for any help you may provide.

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Is there a reason you don't want to use the conventional 'id' as primary_key? You might have an easier time later if you did... –  PinnyM Dec 20 '12 at 19:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try escaping the word 'index' which is reserved. Even better, let Rails do it for you:

class AddIndexColumnToDocument < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_column :documents, :index, :primary_key
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Or better, don't use "index" at all, come up with a different name so that you don't have to backtick it every time you use it in an SQL snippet. –  mu is too short Dec 20 '12 at 19:26
    
That was my comment above about using 'id'. Presumably, if 'id' isn't good enough, then there is a requirement to use specifically 'index'. –  PinnyM Dec 20 '12 at 19:35
1  
I'm just saying that calling a column index in a relational database is just asking for trouble and an ugly mess. If you can't use id for whatever reason, index is still a bad choice for the name. –  mu is too short Dec 20 '12 at 20:24
    
Indeed it is, I actually thought the OP was actually trying to make an INDEX auto-increment before reading it several times... –  PinnyM Dec 20 '12 at 20:30
    
My apologies about the poor column name. Ill definitely rename it to something more logical/less confusing. –  ssell Dec 26 '12 at 18:47

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