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If I'm creating a static library with a header file such as this:

// Myfile.h

#include "SomeHeaderFile.h" // External library

Class MyClass
{

// My code

};

Within my own project I can tell the compiler (in my case, Visual Studio) where to look for SomeHeaderFile.h. However, I don't want my users to be concerned with this - they should be able to include my header without having to inform their compiler about the location of SomeHeaderFile.h.

How is this type of situation normally handled?

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Do you have it at a certain place when users will use your lib?? –  πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 20 '12 at 19:07
    
@g-makulik No, the external library I'm using is a header only library. I want all the declarations/definitions of the external library to be fully incorporated into my own library so that there is no dependency from the user's point of view –  JBentley Dec 20 '12 at 19:09
    
You can just paste the contents of that header into your file. –  Carl Norum Dec 20 '12 at 19:13
    
Hmmm ..., if it's header only then your clients also need to locate it along with your header files if it's types, classes whatever referenced anywhere in your interface needs to be seen. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 20 '12 at 19:13
1  
forward declare the structures/classes of the external library you use in your header file and include the header in your source. –  Mustafa Ozturk Dec 20 '12 at 19:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is a classic "compilation firewall" scenario. There are two simple solutions to do:

  1. Forward-declare any classes or functions that you need from the external library. And then include the external library's header file only within your cpp file (when you actually need to use the classes or functions that you forward-declared in your header).

  2. Use the PImpl idiom (or Cheshire Cat) where you forward-declare an "implementation" class that you declare and define only privately (in the cpp file). You use that private class to put all the external-library-dependent code to avoid having any traces of it in your public class (the one declared in your header file).

Here is an example using the first option:

#ifndef MY_LIB_MY_HEADER_H
#define MY_LIB_MY_HEADER_H

class some_external_class;  // forward-declare external dependency.

class my_class {
  public:
    // ...
    void someFunction(some_external_class& aRef);  // declare members using the forward-declared incomplete type.
};

#endif

// in the cpp file:

#include "my_header.h"
#include "some_external_header.h"

void my_class::someFunction(some_external_class& aRef) {
  // here, you can use all that you want from some_external_class.
};

Here is an example of option 2:

#ifndef MY_LIB_MY_HEADER_H
#define MY_LIB_MY_HEADER_H

class my_class_impl;  // forward-declare private "implementation" class.

class my_class {
  private:
    std::unique_ptr<my_class_impl> pimpl; // a vanishing facade...
  public:
    // ...
};

#endif

// in the cpp file:

#include "my_header.h"
#include "some_external_header.h"

class my_class_impl {
  private:
    some_external_class obj;
    // ...
  public:
    // some functions ... 
};

my_class::my_class() : pimpl(new my_class_impl()) { };
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1  
Caveat emptor: the users will still have to augment their library path in order to locate the dependency's library, provided it's not a header-only library. –  Matthieu M. Dec 20 '12 at 19:53
    
@matthieuM Unless you include the dependency's library (or relevant object files) in the library the user receives, right? –  JBentley Dec 20 '12 at 21:31
    
@JonBentley There are a few options. If you ship a run-time library (.so or .dll) for your library, then you can either statically link that library to the external library (including it into the .so or .dll that you ship), or you can provide the run-time library for the external library (or require the user to install it on his system) which you link dynamically to your library. If you provide a static library (.a or .lib), you'll have to ship (or require) the necessary dependency's libraries (or object files). If you distribute sources, then, of course, people will need everything. –  Mikael Persson Dec 20 '12 at 22:06

Say the external header file contains the following:

external.h

class foo
{
public:
   foo();
};

And in your library you use foo:

myheader.h:

#include "external.h"

class bar
{
...
private:
   foo* _x;
};

To get your code to compile, all you have to do is to forward declare the foo class (after that you can remove the include):

class foo;

class bar
{
...
private:
   foo* _x;
};

You would then have to include external.h in your source file.

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The OP's users would still need to provide a correct linkage path to the external library if the implementation isn't provided completely in the header file or the source is integrated in the resulting lib. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 20 '12 at 19:24
    
@g-makulik I assume OP will statically link the external library in his/her lib. If he/she does this then the clients would not know/care about 3rd party libs. –  Mustafa Ozturk Dec 20 '12 at 19:27
    
Isn't this only an option for shared libs? I thought static libs cannot contain other static libs, can they? –  πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 20 '12 at 19:30
    
@g-makulik I believe you can instruct your compiler to include the entire contents of one static library into another (e.g. using the Librarian in Visual Studio), and that there are tools to manually extract parts of a static library and insert them into another - these are things I've read about but not tried myself. For this particular problem however the third party library only has headers. –  JBentley Dec 20 '12 at 19:34
    
@Mustafa Thanks, helpful answer. I accepted Mikael's simply because he offered an alternative solution in addition to yours. –  JBentley Dec 20 '12 at 19:44

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