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I solved a problem I had, by realizing that if you define a javascript function in a certain context, you cannot call it to run in a different context. Now, I have been exploring ways to accomplish that.

My goal is: I have three windows: The first one is the main window, where my function was created. The second is a newly opened window using window.open. This second window has a button to open the third and last window, making that after opening, that third one should run the same function that was defined in the first window.

I have tried to reference this third window in the main function like this:

(assuming that the name of my window.open variable is w )

var w;
function main() {
    console.log(w);
    ...rest of the code....
}

so I was hoping that it would give a hint to the main function, of the existence of W, the window that I would open later on.

Then, from the second window I would create a button and make an onclick:

w.main;

which wouldn't work...

Is there a different method (or a way to change this one) to make a function aware of the existence of a different context where it was created, so when the moment arrives in the future, is able to run inside of it?

I am reading now about adapting call() to my purpose. Does it make sense, or you would suggest a different way?

share|improve this question
    
Do you mean you want to define a function in window 1 and then call that method from window 3 with the context of window 3 (meaning using window 3's variables instead of window 1's)? Maybe if you could clarify what you are trying to do. – Kenji Dec 20 '12 at 19:32
    
I have a function already defined in window 1. Then window 1 opens a new window (window 2) and from that window 2, I open a third window (window 3) which will run the code defined in window 1 :-) Think, like a search engine: the window 1 has the text box and the search button, the window 2 shows the results list, and the window 3 opens the result site, using a function that was defined in window 1. – telex-wap Dec 20 '12 at 19:35
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming window 1 opens window 2 and window 2 opens window 3 and you are trying to call the main method in window 1 from window 3

window.opener.opener.main();

to set w in window 1 to the window 3 reference when opening it in window 2:

window.opener.w = window.open();

Ok i tested this out. A dialog opens displaying "test" in window 1 after window 3 opens

window1.html:

<html>
<head>

    <script type="text/javascript">
        var child = window.open("window2.html", "window2");

        function test() {
            alert("test");
        }
    </script>

</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>

window2.html:

<html>
<head>

    <script type="text/javascript">
        var child = window.open("window3.html", "window3");
    </script>

</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>

window3.html:

<html>
<head>

    <script type="text/javascript">
        window.opener.opener.test();
    </script>

</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm... this thing with window.opener.opener.main() gives me a: TypeError: 'null' is not an object (evaluating 'window.opener.opener') – telex-wap Dec 20 '12 at 19:21
    
and this was executed in the context of the third window? I've never tried chaining opener in a row like that before, so maybe that is the problem? Although I feel like that should work. – Kenji Dec 20 '12 at 19:23
    
Would be easier for me to understand the problem if you posted the code at jsfiddle.net – Kenji Dec 20 '12 at 19:26
    
Yes, it was executed in the context of third window... I will look into jsfiddle, but the code is around 1000 lines, I don't think it's a very good idea... well, thank you anyways for your tip! I will keep looking into it, maybe I do something else wrong. – telex-wap Dec 20 '12 at 19:37
    
the example i just displayed could be further edited so the method in window1 displays the dialog in the window that calls the method (window3 in this case) – Kenji Dec 20 '12 at 20:47

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