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Forgive me if this has been answered already, as I couldn't find it...

Basically I have an object that needs to take a variadic argument list in it's constructor and store the arguments in a vector. How do I initialize a vector from a the arguments of a variadic constructor?

class GenericNode {
public:
    GenericNode(GenericNode*... inputs) {
            /* Something like... */
        // inputs_.push_back(inputs)...;
}
private:
    std::vector<GenericNode*> inputs_;
};
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1  
There's some invalid syntax in your example. What specifically are you trying to ask? –  Carl Norum Dec 20 '12 at 19:15
8  
use std::initializer_list<GenericNode*>. –  Mooing Duck Dec 20 '12 at 19:15
    
Sorry. To clarify, how do I use the argument list to populate a std::vector? @MooingDuck, i'll look into std::initializer_list. Thanks. –  fredbaba Dec 20 '12 at 19:32
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6 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The best thing would be to use an initializer list

class GenericNode {
public:
    GenericNode(std::initializer_list<GenericNode*> inputs) 
        :inputs_(inputs) {} //well that's easy
private:
    std::vector<GenericNode*> inputs_;
};
int main() {
    GenericNode* ptr;
    GenericNode node{ptr, ptr, ptr, ptr};
} //compilation at http://stacked-crooked.com/view?id=88ebac6a4490915fc4bc608765ba2b6c

The closest to what you already have, using C++11 is to use the vector's initializer_list:

    template<class ...Ts>
    GenericNode(Ts... inputs) 
        :inputs_{inputs...} {} //well that's easy too
    //compilation at http://stacked-crooked.com/view?id=2f7514b33401c51d33677bbff358f8ae

And here's a C++11 version with no initializer_lists at all. It's ugly, and complicated, and requires features missing from many compilers. Use the initializer list

template<class T>
using Alias = T;

class GenericNode {
public:
    template<class ...Ts>
    GenericNode(Ts... inputs) { //SFINAE might be appropriate
         using ptr = GenericNode*;
         Alias<char[]>{( //first part of magic unpacker
             inputs_.push_back(ptr(inputs))
             ,'0')...,'0'}; //second part of magic unpacker
    }
private:
    std::vector<GenericNode*> inputs_;
};
int main() {
    GenericNode* ptr;
    GenericNode node(ptr, ptr, ptr, ptr);
} //compilation at http://stacked-crooked.com/view?id=57c533692166fb222adf5f837891e1f9
//thanks to R. Martinho Fernandes for helping me get it to compile

Unrelated to everything, I don't know if those are owning pointers or not. If they are, use std::unique_ptr instead.

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Wouldn't template<typename... T> GenericNode(T*... inputs) :inputs_{ inputs... } { } be closer to what he already has? i'd still go with std::initializer_list<GenericNode*> though. –  Jonathan Wakely Dec 20 '12 at 20:47
    
@JonathanWakely: No idea why I never thought of that. Fixed. –  Mooing Duck Dec 20 '12 at 20:56
    
@MooingDuck, others: Thanks. Just what I needed. –  fredbaba Dec 20 '12 at 21:11
1  
Aside from the answer itself, and aside from wether it is practical or not, I find your 3rd solution very clever. Is there a guide somewhere explaining the reason for the individual pieces? Specifically, why the need for Alias, and why the need for the last '0' value? –  mmocny Dec 27 '12 at 3:34
1  
@mmocny: I actually copy-pasted it from another answer I'd seen of another SO answer somewhere. The alias is required to make a nameless temporary array, which makes it blatantly clear to any compiler that it doesn't actually need to make the array of chars. For each Ts it adds a '0' to the array. However, if you pass no inputs, that's the same as char t[] = {} which is invalid, so we tack on an extra '0' so there's always at least one element in the temporary array. –  Mooing Duck Dec 27 '12 at 21:08
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You can't use a variadic argument list unless it's a template, you can, as stated, use a initializer_list like this:

class GenericNode {
public:
    GenericNode(std::initializer_list<GenericNode*> inputs) : inputs_(inputs)
    {
    }
private:
    std::vector<GenericNode*> inputs_;
};

template <class ... T>
GenericNode* foo(T ... t)
{
    return new GenericNode({t...});
}
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Why do you have the helper function? –  Mooing Duck Dec 20 '12 at 20:25
    
@MooingDuck Just to show the use of variadic template parameters –  Luke B. Dec 20 '12 at 21:23
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    // inputs_.push_back(inputs)...;

This doesn't work because you can't expand a parameter pack as a statement, only in certain contexts such as a function argument list or initializer-list.

Once you write your constructor signature correctly the answer is easy, just construct the vector with the pack expansion:

#include <vector>

class GenericNode
{
public:
  template<typename... T>
    GenericNode(T*... inputs) : inputs_{ inputs... }
    { }
private:
    std::vector<GenericNode*> inputs_;
};

(You could instead have set it in the constructor body with:

inputs_ = { inputs... };

but the cool kids use member initializers not assignment in the constructor body.)

The downside of this solution is that the template constructor accepts any type of pointer arguments, but will then give an error when trying to construct the vector. You could constrain the template to only accept GenericNode pointers, but accepting a std::initializer_list<GenericNode*> as the other answers suggest effectively does that for you, without requiring ugly enable_if SFINAE tricks.

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Another way to do it:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using std::vector;

template <typename T>
void variadic_vector_emplace(vector<T>&) {}

template <typename T, typename First, typename... Args>
void variadic_vector_emplace(vector<T>& v, First&& first, Args&&... args)
{
    v.emplace_back(std::forward<First>(first));
    variadic_vector_emplace(v, std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

struct my_struct
{
    template <typename... Args>
    my_struct(Args&&... args)
    {
        variadic_vector_emplace(_data, std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }

    vector<int>& data() { return _data; }

private:
  vector<int> _data;
};


int main()
{
    my_struct my(5, 6, 7, 8);

    for(int i : my.data())
      std::cout << i << std::endl;
}
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class Blob
 {
    std::vector<std::string> _v;
 public:

    template<typename... Args>
    Blob(Args&&... args)
    : _v(std::forward<Args>(args)...)
    {  }

};

int main(void)
{
    const char * shapes[3] = { "Circle", "Triangle", "Square" };

    Blob b1(5, "C++ Truths"); 
    Blob b2(shapes, shapes+3);
}

Example from C++11 Truths looks simple enough...;) Not a complete solution but might give you some ideas.

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> Code on LWS <

#include <vector>
#include <initializer_list>

struct generic_node
{
    std::vector<generic_node*> data_;

    generic_node(std::initializer_list<generic_node*> init): data_{init}{}
    generic_node() = default;

    virtual ~generic_node(){ for(auto e : data_) delete e; }
};


int main()
{
    generic_node g;
    generic_node g2{new generic_node};
    generic_node g3{new generic_node{new generic_node, new generic_node},
                    new generic_node};
}
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