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I'm really new to database design, as I will now demonstrate:

I have an MS Sql database that I need to add a table to. The table contains information that pertains to another table. However, there are no candidates for primary keys (all fields can be duplicates). The only thing the table will ever be used for is to keep records that may be required for a certain kind of query, and they can be retrieved super-easily using a field that my other tables also contain (but never uniquely).

Specifically, my main table has a bunch of chemistry records. Each chemistry record is associated with another set of records called quality-control records (in my second table). They are associated by a field called "BatchID". The super-easy part is that I can say, "get all records with this BatchID" and get exactly what I need. But there can be multiple instances of any BatchID in both tables (in fact, there usually are), so I'd need to jump through hoops to link them. In a more general sense, in theory, is it OK to have a table floating around not attached to anything?

The overwhelmingly simple solution is to just put the quality control in the db with no relationships to the chemistry table. I'd need to insert at least one other table to relate it to anything else, maybe more, and the only reason for complicating my life like that is that I don't want to violate some important precept of database design.

My question is, is it ever OK to just have a free-floating table in a database? Or is that right out?

Thanks for any help.

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The scenario you posted is a bit too abstract for me to grasp. Can you give a more substantial example? (ie. what do you mean by "a certain kind of query"?). You do describe a relationship ("they can be retrieved super-easily using a field that my other tables also contain"), so if you can also expand on that, it would help with answering the question. –  Oded Dec 20 '12 at 20:07
    
Thanks for your reply. My main table has a bunch of chemistry records. Each chemistry record is associated with another set of records called quality-control records (in my second table). They are associated by a field called "BatchID". The super-easy part is that I can say, "get all records with this BatchID" and get exactly what I need. But there can be multiple instances of any BatchID in both tables (in fact, there usually are), so I'd need to jump through hoops to link them. In a more general sense, in theory, is it OK to have a table floating around not attached to anything? –  Stanton Dec 20 '12 at 21:00
    
Could you edit the question and add the detail to it instead of in a comment? Comments are considered secondary and some people may not read them. –  Oded Dec 20 '12 at 21:05
    
In regards to your question - there are lookup tables (say a list of countries) that will be referenced by a bunch of other tables but not reference any other table. Is that the kind of thing you mean? –  Oded Dec 20 '12 at 21:07
    
Not exactly. I have control tables like you describe, but they're still linked to the tables they control. –  Stanton Dec 20 '12 at 21:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In theory, it's ok to have a table that doesn't have any foreign key constraints. But the table you describe (both tables you describe) should probably have a foreign key that references the table of batches. We'd expect the table of batches to have "BatchID" as its primary key.

The relational model requires tables to have at least one candidate key. It's almost always a bad idea to have a SQL table that doesn't have a candidate key.

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Thank you Catcall. –  Stanton Dec 22 '12 at 16:37

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