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I'm working on a Windows Service that cycles through a series of databases and then sends SMS messages using HTTP requests. In the beginning of the method that goes through each database, I define a generic list as follows:

public static List<Recipient> Recipients = new List<Recipient>();

I populate that list with the results of an asynchronous HTTP request sent through a thread pool:

//inside main method                    
foreach (var SMS in SMSJoin)
{
    ...

    SMSMessage oSMS = new SMSMessage(Keyword, Number, Message, MessageID);

    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(SendSMS, oSMS);
}

Then it gets passed to the next method:

public static void SendSMS(object SMStoSend)
{
    try
    {
        SMSMessage oSMS = (SMSMessage)SMStoSend;
        ...
        Request.BeginGetRequestStream(new AsyncCallback(GetRequestStreamCallback), state);
    }
    ...
}

Then to GetRequestStreamCallback...

public static void GetRequestStreamCallback(IAsyncResult AsynchronousResult)
{
    State state = (State)AsynchronousResult.AsyncState;
    SMSMessage oSMS = state.oSMS;
    try
    {
        ...
        Request.BeginGetResponse(new AsyncCallback(ReceiveResponse), state);
    }
    ...
}

And finally the response is received and added to the Recipients List:

public static void ReceiveResponse(IAsyncResult Result)
{
    ...
    finally
    {
        oSMS.Complete = DateTime.Now;

        Recipient CompleteMessage = new Recipient(oSMS.MessageID, oSMS.Recipient, oSMS.ErrorCode, oSMS.Complete, oSMS.ResponseCode);
        Recipients.Add(CompleteMessage);
    }

At the end of the code, each response should be added to a Recipient object and then stored in the generic list. The problem is that once about every 1000 or so SMS messages (sent in batches of 50), there is an unhandled IndexOutOfRangeException thrown by the line of code Recipients.Add(CompleteMessage).

I didn't think that there were indexes in the list, and many of the recipients are duplicates. Why would it throw this error, and why only every once in a good while? Could this have to do with threading issues?

As a note, I'm activating the main method from a Timer object, but it will wait until the previous instance is complete before starting a new instance.

Edit: Here is the Recipient class:

public class Recipient
{
    public Recipient(long MessageID, string PhoneNumber, string ErrorMessage, DateTime? Completed, string Response)
    {
        this.MessageID = MessageID;
        this.PhoneNumber = PhoneNumber;
        this.ErrorMessage = ErrorMessage;
        this.Completed = Completed;
        this.Response = Response;
    }

    public long MessageID { get; set; }
    public string PhoneNumber { get; set; }
    public string ErrorMessage { get; set; }
    public DateTime? Completed { get; set; }
    public string Response { get; set; }
}
share|improve this question
    
It sounds like it could be a threading issue. Have you tried making Recipients a backed property with a lock in the set? –  Khan Dec 20 '12 at 21:24
1  
@JefferyKhan sounds like something, but then lock Recipients while performing .Add(). It's only set once. –  CodeCaster Dec 20 '12 at 21:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My guess would that you're running into multiple threads trying to add to Recipients at the same time and one beginning before the prior has finished.

Try locking your Recipients during read and writes and see if it helps:

private static object mylock = new object();
private static List<Recipient> _recipients = new List<Recipient>();
public static List<Recipient> Recipients
{
    get
    {
        List<Recipient> result;
        lock (mylock)
        {
            result = _recipients;
        }
        return result;
    }
    set
    {
        lock (mylock)
        {
            _recipients = value;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not familiar with the use of locks. Should I be assigning that lock to something or using it as you list here? –  ijb109 Dec 20 '12 at 22:00
    
Use it as I have mentioned above and see if you still encounter the exception. Note that there are two different ways to implement it above. My initial thought, and CodeCaster's. Don't do both ;) –  Khan Dec 20 '12 at 22:05
    
Well, so far so good, but it'll be a difficult one to test :) –  ijb109 Dec 21 '12 at 14:17
1  
Although theoretically these should have the same result, I got some pretty bizarre behavior when I did the second one. So, your initial response works better in this instance. Thanks a bunch! –  ijb109 Dec 21 '12 at 15:11
    
Thanks, i'll remove the second suggestion! –  Khan Dec 21 '12 at 15:56

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