Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I send 0xFF to the serial port

I see 0x3F as a result.

All other bytes are proper.

The situation is like this...

External box sends these bytes to the PC...

0xFF, 0x0D, 0x00, 0x30, 0x31, 0x53, 0x55, 0x43, 0x43, 0x45, 0x53, 0x53

C# produces this in the buffers...

0x3F, 0x0D, 0x00, 0x30, 0x31, 0x53, 0x55, 0x43, 0x43, 0x45, 0x53, 0x53

The first byte is missing the first two bits. Has anyone seen this before ?

If there is a post here which explains what's going on, and more importantly why, and even most importantly, how to fix it, please point me to it. Thank you.

Here's the code; I hope that I've figured out the StackOverFlow system; still a new comer to both this community and my C# knowledge is about 1 or 2 months old.

 public static void OurBackGroundSerialPortReceiver(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e )
    {
                                                                //// Item 1, tell the world, particularly the
                                                                //// chief dispatch routin, that we are receiving

        aUartSemaphoreThatTells.WhatTheUartBackgroundRxIsDoing = (int)aValueWhichIndicatesThat.theUARTisReceivingData;

        SerialPort CurrentPort = (SerialPort)sender;            //// Int routine gave is this in the arguments

        int LastByteInUartBuffer = CurrentPort.ReadBufferSize;
        int TheLastByteTheBoxSent = CurrentPort.BytesToRead;
        string inputData = CurrentPort.ReadExisting();          //// This is a C# property method of ports

        int Dest;
        Dest = UartPlaceHolders.RxBufferLeader;                 //// Will index into buffer for Chief dispatch

        int Source;                                             //// Will index into Uart buffer to fish it out
        Source = 0;                                             //// therefore, we start at zero

        int TopEdge;                                            //// We'll calculate this here once instead of in the loops below
        TopEdge = (int)TheSizeOf.OneSecondsWorthOfData;         //// This will tell us when to wrap around


        if (Dest < UartPlaceHolders.RxBufferTrailer)            //// Half the time we'll have wrap-around
        {                                                       //// If that's the case, then the trailer > the leader
            while (
                  (Dest < UartPlaceHolders.RxBufferTrailer)     //// If we are wrapped, make sure we don't
                   &&                                           //// overtake either the trailer or
                   (Dest < TopEdge)                             //// go over the top edge
                   &&                                           //// At the same time, make sure that
                   (Source <= LastByteInUartBuffer)             //// we don't fish out more than is there
                   )
            {
                UartData.TheImmediateSecondOfData[Dest] = (byte)inputData[Source];      //// Move bytes into buff for chief
                Dest = Dest + 1;
                Source = Source + 1;
            }

            if (Source >= LastByteInUartBuffer)                 //// Have we done all the bytes for this event ?            
            {                                                   //// Yes, therefore we will update the leader
                UartPlaceHolders.RxBufferLeader = Dest;         //// This tells us where to start next time

                aUartSemaphoreThatTells.WhatTheUartBackgroundRxIsDoing = (int)aValueWhichIndicatesThat.WeHaveReceivedSomeData;

                return;                                         //// and we are done
            }
                                                                //// //  //   Else no, more bytes so...
            else if (Dest >= TopEdge)                           //// Did we wrap around ?
            {                                                   //// Yes, so
                Dest = 0;                                       //// wrap around to the start
                while (                                         //// Now we do the same thing again
                      Dest < UartPlaceHolders.RxBufferTrailer   //// C# and windows keep buffers at 4K max, 
                      &&                                        //// so we will wrap only once
                      Source < LastByteInUartBuffer             //// May not even need that other test
                      )                                         //// This will finish the rest of the bytes
                {
                    UartData.TheImmediateSecondOfData[Dest] = (byte)inputData[Source];      //// There they go
                    Dest = Dest + 1;
                    Source = Source + 1;
                }

                UartPlaceHolders.RxBufferLeader = Dest;         //// This tells us where to start next time
                return;
            }

            else                                             //// Dest is neither <, >, nor =, we have logic error
            {
                ErrorFlags.SerialPortErrorDescription = (int)AnError.ExistsInTheSerialPortBufferPointers;
                return;
            }

        }

        if (Dest >= UartPlaceHolders.RxBufferTrailer)           //// Now, if the Trailer is ahead of the leader, here we go
        {                                                       //// If that's the case, then the trailer > the leader
            while (
                //(Dest < UartPlaceHolders.RxBufferTrailer)     //// This is the first major difference twixt this time & previous...
                // &&                                           //// ...because This condition is defacto guarateed to be false now
                   (Dest < TopEdge)                             //// We still want to stop before we hit the top edge
                   &&                                           //// At the same time, make sure that we go past...
                   (Source < LastByteInUartBuffer)              //// ...the last byte the Uart gave us
                   &&
                   (Source < TheLastByteTheBoxSent)
                   )
            {
                UartData.TheImmediateSecondOfData[Dest] = (byte)inputData[Source];      //// Move bytes into buff for chief
                Dest = Dest + 1;
                Source = Source + 1;
            }

            if (Source >= LastByteInUartBuffer)                 //// Have we done all the bytes for this event ?
            {                                                   //// Yes, therefore we will update the leader
                UartPlaceHolders.RxBufferLeader = Dest;         //// This tells us where to start next time
                return;                                         //// and we are done
            }                                                   //// //   Else no, we have more bytes to move, so...
            else if (Dest >= TopEdge)                           //// Did we wrap around ?
            {                                                   //// Yes, so...
                Dest = 0;                                       //// wrap around to the start
                while (                                         //// Now we do the same thing again
                      Dest < UartPlaceHolders.RxBufferTrailer   //// C# and windows keep buffers at 4K max, 
                      &&                                        //// so we will wrap only once
                      Source < LastByteInUartBuffer
                      )
                {
                    UartData.TheImmediateSecondOfData[Dest] = (byte)inputData[Source];
                    Dest = Dest + 1;
                    Source = Source + 1;
                }

                UartPlaceHolders.RxBufferLeader = Dest;         //// This tells us where to start next time

                aUartSemaphoreThatTells.WhatTheUartBackgroundRxIsDoing = (int)aValueWhichIndicatesThat.WeHaveReceivedSomeData;

                return;
            }

            else                                                //// Dest is neither <, >, nor =, we have logic error
            {
                ErrorFlags.SerialPortErrorDescription = (int)AnError.ExistsInTheSerialPortBufferPointers;
                return;
            }

        }

    }
share|improve this question
6  
Please show the code you're using. –  Jon Skeet Dec 20 '12 at 21:20
    
What's the baudrate? Real serial port or USB/serial converter? How long is your serial cable? –  TJD Dec 20 '12 at 21:27
1  
We'd need to see more code. My guess is that something that doesn't support extended ASCII is trying to interpret 0xFF as a character so it replaces it with a question mark (whose 8-bit representation is 0x3F). Here's someone experiencing a similar problem –  Gunther Fox Dec 20 '12 at 21:28
    
Okay, I think I added the code. I hope I'm not data flooding the too much detail. The entire routine was 125 lines long. Hope that's okay –  User.1 Dec 20 '12 at 21:43
    
Baudrate is ostensibly 115200, but as I (painfully) learned in my early work with the serial port; that's a lie. It's a BlueTooth plugged into a USB cable. Looks like it's about 3 feet long. Looks half-way shielded okay. –  User.1 Dec 20 '12 at 21:44

1 Answer 1

Here's where the answer was found...

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.ports.serialport.aspx

Scroll down to "Read" and it will detail the method used to do this, found here...

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143549.aspx

This is the code that fixed this problem for the moment (maybe for good)

        SerialPort CurrentPort = (SerialPort)sender;                                //// caller gave us this in the arguments

        int TheNumberOfBytes = CurrentPort.BytesToRead;                             // The system will tell us how large our array should be

        byte[] inputData = new byte[TheNumberOfBytes];                              // Our array is not that large

        int WeReadThisMany = CurrentPort.Read(inputData, 0, TheNumberOfBytes);      //// This is a C# property method of ports

Hope I'm doing the proper thing by answering here.

Anyway, the end result of this is that this method reads the real bytes, as bytes, that are sent to the Serial port by whatever was on the other side.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.