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My Address Table looks like this:

AddressID Street        City         AddressTypeID    PersonID
1         1st 2ave      Edmonton     1                10
2         3st 6ave      Edmonton     2                10
3         8st 5ave      Edmonton     5                10
4         7st 4ave      Edmonton     2                11
5         2st 9ave      Edmonton     3                12
6         9st 2ave      Edmonton     5                12

In that table the personid 10 has 3 different type of addresses. I would like the result is group by personID which has the priority of addressTypeID 1, if the person doesn't has addresstypeID 1 then use addresstypeID 5

I would like the output looks like this:

AddressID Street        City         AddressTypeID    PersonID
1         1st 2ave      Edmonton     1                10
4         7st 4ave      Edmonton     2                11
6         9st 2ave      Edmonton     5                12

Thank you for answering my question

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3  
What have you tried? –  Kermit Dec 20 '12 at 21:24
    
If you map AddressTypeID = 1 to 1, AddressTypeID = 5 to 2 and AddressTypeID = 2 to NULL this is just another variant of the greatest-n-per-group problem. Unfortunately I don't know how that is done in MSSQL. ;) –  AndreKR Dec 20 '12 at 21:26
    
What is the logic for PersonID 11? He has neither 1 nor 5. Is it possible for one person to have both AddressTypeID 2 and 3 but not 1 or 5? Do you have a specific order of preference for all possible AddressTypeID values? –  Pondlife Dec 20 '12 at 21:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is easiest not as a group by but by using the row_number() function:

select a.*
from (select a.*,
             row_number() over (partition by personId
                                order by (case when AddressTypeId = 1 then 1
                                               when AddressTYpeId = 5 then 2
                                               else 3
                                          end)
                               ) as seqnum
      from addresses a
     ) a
where seqnum = 1

Notice that I use a case statement in the order by clause to specify your priority level.

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+1... great minds think alike? –  Michael Fredrickson Dec 20 '12 at 21:34
; with cte as (
    select 
        a.AddressID, a.Street, a.City, a.AddressTypeID, a.PersonID,
        row_number() over(
            partition by a.PersonID 
            order by case a.AddressTypeID
                when 1 then 1
                when 5 then 2
                else 3
            end
        ) as rn
    from address a
)
select *
from cte
where rn = 1
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Something like

SELECT AddressTable.* FROM AddressTable INNER JOIN 

(SELECT PersonID, MIN(AddressID) as MinAddressID GROUP BY PersonID) AS MinIdTable ON 

AddressTable.AddressID = MinIdTable.MinIdTable
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1  
The fallback order was 1 then 5 and never 2. –  AndreKR Dec 20 '12 at 21:28

First, filter the table to include only the rows with AddressTypeID as 1 or 5, via subquery. Then select the single one per person with the lowest AddressTypeID (since you want 1 to have priority over 5)

select 
    *
from
    (select * from myaddresstable 
    where AddressTypeID in (1, 5))
where
    row_number() over (partition by PersonID order by AddressTypeID asc) = 1
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