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How to join those multiple queries into one (can I?)

$query = "DELETE FROM aktywne_kody WHERE kodsms ='$kodSMSgracza' AND typkodu ='$id'";
mysql_query($query) or die(mysql_error());

$query = "INSERT INTO uzyte_kody (gracz, kodsms, typkodu) VALUES ('$nickGracza', '$kodSMSgracza', '$id')";
mysql_query($query) or die("Błąd MySQL X04");

$query = "INSERT INTO do_odebrania (gracz, itemDATA, itemQTY) VALUES ('$nickGracza', '$itemDATA', '$itemQTY')";
mysql_query($query) or die("Błąd MySQL X05");

By the way is it better if I do mysql_close($db) after all queries are done?

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1  
Make one $query and just make sure you add an ; after each line. –  Pitchinnate Dec 20 '12 at 21:35
1  
Why do you need this? Most of the time readability is more important than little efficiencies. –  Muatik Dec 20 '12 at 21:35
3  
Please don't use mysql_query in new applications. It's deprecated and dangerous. At the very least use PDO to ensure your data is escaped properly before you end up in severe trouble because of a SQL injection bug. –  tadman Dec 20 '12 at 21:40
2  
Joining them with ; gives You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'INSERT INTO uzyte_kody (gracz, kodsms, typkodu) VALUES ('UltraMC', '00000000', '' at line 1 –  John Smith Dec 20 '12 at 21:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Pass 65536 as mysql_connect's 5th parameter.

Example:

$conn = mysql_connect('localhost','username','password', true, 65536) or die("cannot connect");
mysql_select_db('database_name') or die("cannot use database");
mysql_query("
    INSERT INTO table1 (field1,field2) VALUES(1,2);

    INSERT INTO table2 (field3,field4,field5) VALUES(3,4,5);

    DELETE FROM table3 WHERE field6 = 6;

    UPDATE table4 SET field7 = 7 WHERE field8 = 8;

    INSERT INTO table5
       SELECT t6.field11, t6.field12, t7.field13
       FROM table6 t6
       INNER JOIN table7 t7 ON t7.field9 = t6.field10;

    -- etc
");

When you are working with mysql_fetch_* or mysql_num_rows, or mysql_affected_rows, only the first statement is valid.

For example, the following codes, the first statement is INSERT, you cannot execute mysql_num_rows and mysql_fetch_*. It is okay to use mysql_affected_rows to return how many rows inserted.

$conn = mysql_connect('localhost','username','password', true, 65536) or die("cannot connect");
mysql_select_db('database_name') or die("cannot use database");
mysql_query("
    INSERT INTO table1 (field1,field2) VALUES(1,2);
    SELECT * FROM table2;
");

Another example, the following codes, the first statement is SELECT, you cannot execute mysql_affected_rows. But you can execute mysql_fetch_assoc to get a key-value pair of row resulted from the first SELECT statement, or you can execute mysql_num_rows to get number of rows based on the first SELECT statement.

$conn = mysql_connect('localhost','username','password', true, 65536) or die("cannot connect");
mysql_select_db('database_name') or die("cannot use database");
mysql_query("
    SELECT * FROM table2;
    INSERT INTO table1 (field1,field2) VALUES(1,2);
");
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5  
Holy Mother of God! –  John Smith Dec 22 '12 at 10:30
4  
If anyone wonders why this works - it's not a trick it's just undocumented (in PHP docs) feature of mySQL client. In sources you can easily find #define CLIENT_MULTI_STATEMENTS 65536 /* Enable/disable multi-stmt support */ which is exactly what OP wanted. –  Marcin Orlowski Dec 22 '12 at 15:59
3  
For code readability; Pass CLIENT_MULTI_STATEMENTS as mysql_connect's 5th parameter. –  Jonas Äppelgran Apr 8 '14 at 8:54
    
@Husni, Why do you use a "magic number" like 65536 instead of proper constant names? –  Pacerier Mar 11 at 10:32

You can just add the word JOIN or add a ; after each line(as @pictchubbate said). Better this way because of readability and also you should not meddle DELETE with INSERT; it is easy to go south.

The last question is a matter of debate, but as far as I know yes you should close after a set of queries. This applies mostly to old plain mysql/php and not PDO, mysqli. Things get more complicated(and heated in debates) in these cases.

Finally, I would suggest either using PDO or some other method.

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With mysqli you're able to use multiple statements for real using mysqli_multi_query().

Read more on multiple statements in the PHP Docs.

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