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I have a Console application hosting a WCF service. I would like to be able to fire an event from a method in the WCF service and handle the event in the hosting process of the WCF service. Is this possible? How would I do this? Could I derive a custom class from ServiceHost?

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up vote 13 down vote accepted

You don't need to inherit from ServiceHost. There are other approaches to your problem.

You can pass an instance of the service class, instead of a type to ServiceHost. Thus, you can create the instance before you start the ServiceHost, and add your own event handlers to any events it exposes.

Here's some sample code:

MyService svc = new MyService();
svc.SomeEvent += new MyEventDelegate(this.OnSomeEvent);
ServiceHost host = new ServiceHost(svc);
host.Open();

There are some caveats when using this approach, as described in http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms585487.aspx

Or you could have a well-known singleton class, that your service instances know about and explicitly call its methods when events happen.

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Nice! Both approaches make perfect sense to me; I feel foolish I didn't think of either one of those myself. I guess I've just been blinded by the complexity of WCF itself, since its new to me. – dotnetengineer Sep 26 '08 at 14:39
using ...
using ...

namespace MyWCFNamespace
{

class Program {

static void Main(string[] args){
//instantiate the event receiver
Consumer c = new Consumer();

// instantiate the event source
WCFService svc = new WCFService();
svc.WCFEvent += new SomeEventHandler(c.ProcessTheRaisedEvent);

using(ServiceHost host = new ServiceHost(svc))
{
  host.Open();
  Console.Readline();
}
}
}


public class Consumer()
{
public void ProcessTheRaisedEvent(object sender, MyEventArgs e)
{
Console.WriteLine(e.From.toString() + "\t" + e.To.ToString());
}

}
}


namespace MyWCFNamespace
{
public delegate void SomeEventHandler(object sender,MyEventArgs e)


[ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode=InstanceContextMode.Single)]
public class WCFService : IWCFService 
{
public event SomeEventHandler WCFEvent;

public void someMethod(Message message)
{
MyEventArgs e = new MyEventArgs(message);
OnWCFEvent(e);
}

public void OnWCFEvent(MyEventArgs e)
{
SomeEventHandler handler = WCFEvent;
if(handler!=null)
{
 handler(this,e);
}
}

// to do 
// Implement WCFInterface methods here
}


public class MyEventArgs:EventArgs
{
private Message _message;
public MyEventArgs(Message message) 
{
this._message=message;
}
}
public class Message
{
string _from;
string _to;
public string From {get{return _from;} set {_from=value;}}
public string To {get{return _to;} set {_to=value;}}
public Message(){}
public Message(string from,string to)
this._from=from;
this._to=to;
}
}

You can define your WCF service with InstanceContextMode=InstanceContextMode.Single.

TestService svc = new TestService();
svc.SomeEvent += new MyEventHandler(receivingObject.OnSomeEvent);
ServiceHost host = new ServiceHost(svc);
host.Open();

[ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode=InstanceContextMode.Single)] // so that a single service instance is created
    public class TestService : ITestService
    {
        public event MyEventHandler SomeEvent;
        ...
        ...
    }

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