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In Item 71 in 'Effective Java, Second Edition' the Double-check idiom and the single-check idiom are introduced for lazily instantiating instance fields.

Double-check idiom

private volatile FieldType field;
FieldType getField() {
  FieldType result = field;
  if (result == null) {
    synchronized(this) {
      result == field;
      if (result == null)
        field = result = computeFieldValue();
    }
  }
  return result;
}

Single-check idiom

private volatile FieldType field;
FieldType getField() {
  FieldType result = field;
  if (result == null) {
    field = result = computeFieldValue();
  }
  return result;
}

In the double-check idiom Joshua states, that the result variable is used to make sure that the volatile field is only read once, which improves performance. This I understand, however I don't see why we need it in the single-check idiom, since we only read field once anyway.

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Double-check is obsolete since there are multi-processor environments: ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-dcl/index.html –  alfasin Dec 20 '12 at 21:46
2  
@alfasin: this IBM article is obsolete. With the Java 5 memory model and guarantees over volatile fields, the above double-check idiom is OK. –  JB Nizet Dec 20 '12 at 21:48
    
memory model is not the only problem here, start reading at "A JIT compiler would see an optimization opportunity here..." –  alfasin Dec 20 '12 at 21:51
    
@alfasin: this article is from 2002. Eleven years ago. Things have changed since then. Don't you think Josh Bloch knows what he's talking about? –  JB Nizet Dec 20 '12 at 21:55
    
@JBNizet is that a way of arguing ? should I count on what someone said/wrote ? personally, I like to understand the reasons behind things rather than "count on someone's word" even if it's a guru... –  alfasin Dec 20 '12 at 22:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the single-check idiom, without the result variable you'd still be reading it twice; once for the null check and once for the return value.

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I prefer the following implementation of lazy evaluation:

@ThreadSafe
class MyClass {
    private static class MyClassHelper {
       public static final MyClass helper = new MyClass();
    }

    public static MyClass getInstance() {
        return MyClassHelper.helper;
    }
}
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Doesn't compile. –  JB Nizet Dec 20 '12 at 22:23
    
This is the proper method for lazy initialize room. While other methods can achieve the same effect, here you rely on the Classloader's for an elegant solution. Though I would make helper field final. –  Jared Paolin Dec 20 '12 at 22:34
    
It doesn't compile because of he uses "HelperHolder.helper" instead of "MyClassHelper.holder", just a small change/typo. –  Jared Paolin Dec 20 '12 at 22:36
    
@JBNizet I wrote it on notepad... fixed. Thanks Jared! :) –  alfasin Dec 20 '12 at 22:58
1  
Thanks, this solution only works for static fields though. –  Will Dec 21 '12 at 9:10

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