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Having a Matrix M of size m, n over integers, what would be a good algorithm to transform it such that the sum of all elements is maximal?

The only operations allowed are multiplying by -1 column-wise or row-wise. There can be executed as many such operations as required.

Rough, overall idea: What I have thought about is to move each minus sign from one such negative number to the positive number whose value is smallest, such that the minus would have the least influence on the sum.

Let's take for instance:

import numpy as np

M = np.matrix([
        [2,2,2,2],
        [2,2,-2,2],
        [2,2,2,2],
        [2,2,2,1],
    ])

def invert_at(M, n, m):
    M[n,:] *= -1
    M[:,m] *= -1

I've tried this by building one of the shortest paths from the negative element to the smallest number and invert_at each cell on the way there.

First by including the start and end cells:

invert_at(M, 1, 2)  # start
invert_at(M, 2, 2)
invert_at(M, 3, 2)
invert_at(M, 3, 3)  # end

I end up with:

[[ 2  2 -2 -2]
 [-2 -2 -2  2]
 [-2 -2  2  2]
 [ 2  2 -2 -1]]

which kind of looks interesting. It pushes the minus to the -1 in the bottom right corner, but also to some other areas. Now if I would invert again at the start and the end position (that is, -1 * -1 = 1), so leaving out the start and end cells in the first place, I end up with:

[[ 2  2  2  2]
 [ 2  2 -2  2]
 [-2 -2 -2 -2]
 [-2 -2 -2 -1]]

which looks better, considering I want to get at

[[ 2  2  2  2]
 [ 2  2  2  2]
 [ 2  2  2  2]
 [ 2  2  2 -1]]

by "pushing" the minus towards the right "half" of the matrix.

Talking about "halves", I've also played (a lot) with the idea of using partitions of the matrix, but I couldn't observe any usable patterns.

Most of the things I've tried have led me back to the original matrix and this "avalanche effect" we can observe drives me crazy.

What would be a good approach to solve this problem?

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Have I misunderstood the problem? At the face of it it seems very simple, if you can only multiply by -1 then you just have to determine whether you have more negative terms than positive and if true then *=-1? –  arynaq Dec 20 '12 at 22:15
1  
Yes it seems I have, I will get back to this after my exam tomorrow, looks like a fun problem, I will try and come up with a bruteforce, usually they reveal some pattern..usually. –  arynaq Dec 20 '12 at 22:28
1  
I remember a similar problem: Given a grid of MxN (M,N > 1) lightbulbs(initially turned off) with a switch for each row and column, determine an algorithm that produces a grid with only one lightbulb turned on. I remember that there was a smart trick about turning on and off the right intersections of rows and columns to turn off one-by-one all the lightbulbs, but it wont come back to my mind... –  Bakuriu Dec 20 '12 at 22:33
    
@Bakuriu: That problem reduces to some linear algebra mod 2. Here we need to maximise a function and that's nowhere near as easy. –  tmyklebu Dec 20 '12 at 23:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Any of n rows or m columns can be either flipped (-1) or unflipped (1).

This means that the total number of possibilities is 2^(n+m). This means that there is a solution that can be found in exponential time. For small matrices you can use brute force, searching for all possible combinations of flipped and unflipped columns and rows.

You do however need to wait until everything is applied, or you're going to get stuck in local minima.

In this specific case, M is already the maximal sum (27)

import numpy as np

def bit_iter(n):
    for i in xrange(2**(n)):
        bits = []
        for j in xrange(n):
            if i & (2**j) != 0:
                bits.append(1)
            else:
                bits.append(0)
        yield bits

def maximal_sum(M):
    Morig = M.copy()
    n, m = M.shape
    best = None
    for bits in bit_iter(n + m):
        nvec = bits[:n]
        mvec = bits[n:]
        assert(len(nvec) + len(mvec) == len(bits))
        M = Morig.copy()
        for i, v in enumerate(nvec):
            if v == 0:
                M[i, :] *= -1
        for i, v in enumerate(mvec):
            if v == 0:
                M[:, i] *= -1
        if best == None or np.sum(M) > np.sum(best):
            best = M
    return best

M = np.matrix([
    [2,2,2,2],
    [2,2,-2,2],
    [2,2,2,2],
    [2,2,2,1],
])
print maximal_sum(M)
M = np.matrix([
        [1,2],[3,-4]
    ])
print maximal_sum(M)
M = np.matrix([
        [2,-2,2,2],
        [2,2,2,2],
        [2,2,-2,2],
        [2,2,2,2],
        [2,2,2,1],
    ])
print maximal_sum(M)

Gives:

[[ 2  2  2  2]
 [ 2  2 -2  2]
 [ 2  2  2  2]
 [ 2  2  2  1]]
[[-1  2]
 [ 3  4]]
[[ 2 -2  2  2]
 [ 2  2  2  2]
 [ 2  2 -2  2]
 [ 2  2  2  2]
 [ 2  2  2  1]]
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1  
@Flavius - bug fixed. Thanks –  Andrew Walker Dec 20 '12 at 23:21
1  
A variant of your method can do this in O(2^(min(m,n)) poly(m+n)) time. Given a signing of the rows, you don't actually need brute force to find the optimal signing of the columns. –  tmyklebu Dec 20 '12 at 23:34
1  
@Flavius - fixed again –  Andrew Walker Dec 20 '12 at 23:36
2  
Once you've decided which rows to flip, you decide which columns to flip by flipping exactly those columns where flipping improves the objective value. –  tmyklebu Dec 21 '12 at 0:41
1  
Greedy isn't going to be anywhere close to right. You want to do an exhaustive search. You want to prune branches in your exhaustive search as early as you can since the search space is enormous. I tried to outline in my answer what I think is the most promising way to do such an exhaustive search for reasonably big matrices. It's in no way trivial and it employs a lot of machinery, but such is the nature of practicable solutions to problems like these. –  tmyklebu Dec 21 '12 at 3:46

The problem is most likely NP-hard as an instance of pseudo-Boolean function (PB) optimization.

You can denote with Boolean variable x_i the fact "i-th row was negated", and with Boolean variable y_j the fact "j-th column was negated".

Then, the "flip sign" of each matrix element can be described as

 c(i, j) = 1 - 2*x_i - 2*y_j + 4*x_i*y_j .

So, given your matrix M, your problem asks to maximize the PB function

 f = sum A[i,j]*c(i, j) .

Optimization of PB functions is known to be NP-hard, so unless this particular class of functions admits a clever solution, smart brute-forcing (Andrew's solutions) seems the way to go.

There is a nice write-up for a very similar problem in this blog post.

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I'm not sure that your problem has a polynomial time solution. I don't think it does, but I also don't see how to prove that it's NP-complete.

One approach that might be promising is to write it as a (nonconvex) quadratic program: we want to find vectors v and w such that -1 <= v <= 1, -1 <= w <= 1, and v^T M w is as large as possible. This is a relaxation; I'm not requiring v and w only to have +/-1 entries, but it has the same optimal solution as your problem. You should be able to find a "reasonable" convex quadratic relaxation to this problem and then build a branch-and-bound scheme on top of it.

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