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I'm having trouble with a site I'm designing. Unfortunately I've fallen into the trap of not designing it for Internet Explorer first, but stuck to a friendlier browser such as Chrome. Now that I look at a it in IE, I've found a problem that I'm a bit dumbfounded by.

The menu links here-

http://mydomain.com/apassociates/page/home

...flicker and collapse. If you want to see how it's supposed to look please check it out in Chrome.

I'm not a professional web developer and I suspect that these problems could be elementary to the more experienced developer, but I'm not actually sure where to begin.

Does anyone have any thoughts or pointers for either of this problem?


So to try an help focus this as per the advice from the comments, here's the HTML-

<div id='home-pictures'>

    <a href='http://mydomain.com/apassociates/page/conservatory'>
        <div id='home-1'>
            <span class='home-link'>Traditional</span>
        </div>
    </a>
    <a href='http://mydomain.com/apassociates/page/blackbrookhouse'>
        <div id='home-2'>
            <span class='home-link'>Commercial</span>
        </div>
    </a>
    <a href='http://mydomain.com/apassociates/page/floodproof'>
        <div id='home-3'>
            <span class='home-link'>Innovative</span>
        </div>
    </a>
</div>

The javascript here, works to replace the background image upon mouseover-

// home links
$('div#home-1').mouseover(function () {
  $('div#home-1').css('background-image', 'url(/apassociates/images/content/devonhouse-caption-wash.png)');
});

$('div#home-1').mouseleave(function () {
  $('div#home-1').css('background-image', 'url(/apassociates/images/content/devonhouse-caption.png)');
}); 

I've only included the code for the first link, the other code is just a duplication of these with different identity tags.

I'm left wondering whether I would do better to put each link into its own div of fixed dimension. Might that prevent the collapsing/flickering?

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Sparky, AlphaMale, Will Dec 21 '12 at 15:55

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Could give this a shot - add this META tag: <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="ie=edge,chrome=1" />. Not the recommended way to go about it but can often provide a quick-fix. –  Marty Dec 20 '12 at 22:26
    
giving this a go now, thanks! –  goose Dec 20 '12 at 22:26
3  
You will get better answers if you provide a small self-contained example, which contains just enough code to demonstrate the problem, without anything extra. Do this for each of your differetn questions. Post this code into the question, or in a JSFiddle (jsfiddle.net). Doing this can be a lot of work, but it's a critical part of the process of troubleshooting your problem. –  KatieK Dec 20 '12 at 22:29
1  
The background image on your page is 2.6mb. Just sayin'. –  Billy Moat Dec 20 '12 at 23:01
1  
Your carousel_image spans which are within the 'a' tags are set as 'block' level elements. You shouldn't have block level elements with 'a' tags. Older IE versions may grumble about that. –  Billy Moat Dec 20 '12 at 23:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I managed to isolate your problem and resolve it in this fiddle.

HTML:

<div id="home-pictures">
    <a href="http://mikloswe.nextmp.net/apassociates/page/conservatory">
        <div id="home-1" style="background-image: url(http://mikloswe.nextmp.net/apassociates/images/content/devonhouse-caption.png);">
            <span class="home-link">Traditional</span>
        </div>
    </a>
    <a href="http://mikloswe.nextmp.net/apassociates/page/blackbrookhouse">
        <div id="home-2" style="background-image: url(http://mikloswe.nextmp.net/apassociates/images/content/carehome-caption.png);">
            <span class="home-link">Commercial</span>
        </div>
    </a>
    <a href="http://mikloswe.nextmp.net/apassociates/page/floodproof">
        <div id="home-3" style="background-image: url(http://mikloswe.nextmp.net/apassociates/images/content/submersible-caption.png);">
            <span class="home-link">Innovative</span>
        </div>
    </a>
</div>

CSS:

#home-pictures {
    height: 250px;
}
#home-pictures {
    text-align: center;
}
#home-pictures a:link,
#home-pictures a:visited {
    color: #B43104;
    display: block;
    text-decoration: none;
}
#home-1, #home-2, #home-3 {
    margin-left: 20px;
    float: left;
    height: 256px;
    width: 285px;
    zoom: 1;
}
.home-link {
    color: #B43104;
    display: block;
    float: left;
    font-family: 'book antiqua', palatino, serif;
    font-size: 24px;
    margin-left: 15px;
    position: relative;
    top: 220px;
}

JavaScript:

// home links
$('div#home-1, div#home-2, div#home-3').mouseenter(function () {
    $(this).css({
        'filter' : 'alpha(opacity=50)',
        'opacity' : '0.5'
    });
}).mouseleave(function () {
  $(this).css({
        'filter' : 'alpha(opacity=100)',
        'opacity' : '1.0'
    });
});

I changed the javascript so that it doesn't rely on images for the hover, but on opacity. That will affect the font below the image since it's also within the div, but maybe you could have a dedicated div within each one of these (like 'div.image') and set the background & opacity to only the image and not the whole item...

UPDATE:

Opacity can be tricky on IE. Updated the css and javascript so that it works on IE too... The fiddle was updated as well. Cross-browser opacity was taken from this post, which I keep coming back to...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Wallace, opactiy would seem to be the way to go, maybe I just need to simplify this whole part. I tried to implement what you've posted, but it doesn't seem to have done the trick. I suspect I missed something though. Cheers for your help! –  goose Dec 20 '12 at 23:44
    
Note that I only made the url to the image absolute to be able to work on the fiddle. You don't have to do that locally. You can still go the image way if you want, but I think the opacity one demands less overhead. In this case, mouseenter combined with mouseleave will give more reliable results. The function can be significantly simplified, as you can see. Going to bed now, let me know how it went once you have tested it. ;) –  Wallace Sidhrée Dec 20 '12 at 23:45
    
Updated the code with support for opacity on Internet Explorer 5-9. –  Wallace Sidhrée Dec 21 '12 at 0:14
    
Thanks Wallace, I'll check it out and let you know. –  goose Dec 21 '12 at 6:44
    
I managed to solve this. I opacity as you said, but I noticed that I'd left some styles linked to a:hover that was interfering with the Javascript, removing it helped a lot. I also found this tutorial very helpful- shopdev.co.uk/blog/animated-menus-using-jquery/ thanks again for your help. –  goose Dec 23 '12 at 8:11

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