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Here's the problem I've been trying to tackle for a few days.

I need to write a program that gets a sorted array. The program will put 999 where two adjacent blocks have the same value, and then put all the 999 in the end of the array. I need to do this without using another array and the program must be O(n).

example input:

50,60,60,72,81,81,81,81,93,93

desired output:

50,60,72,81,93,999,999,999,999,999

another example:

1,1,2,3,4,4,5,6,6

desired output:

1,2,3,4,5,6,999,999,999

my code. It's not working. For the first example the output is alright. for the second example i get 1,2,3,4,5,4,5,6,-14568127 (out of array bounds)

my algorithm is i walk through the array with two indexes, i and j, if a[i]!=a[i+1] then i advance i. if they are equal, j looks for the next unique value, and puts it in a[i+1].

I'd love to hear better ideas or a code to do this. in C.

while((j!=size-1)&&(a[size-1]!=a[i]))
{
     if(a[i]!=a[i+1])
     {
         i++;
         j=i;
     }
     if(a[i]==a[i+1])
     {
         j=i;
         while(a[i]==a[j])
               j++;
         a[i+1]=a[j];
         i++;
         if(j!=size-1)
              j=i;
     }
}
i++
for(;i<size;i++)
      a[i]=999;

I've edited the code, now I do it as chen suggested. First i iterate through the array putting 999 where the doubles are, problem arises when I want to switch though. here's the code I wrote for re-sorting the array: each time i put a 999 somewhere, count++.

It's working for the two examples I gave perfectly. Thanks everyone.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
void main()
{
    int *a;
    int i=0,j=0,size,count=0;
    printf("Enter the size of the array\n");
    scanf("%d", &size);
    a=(int *)calloc(size,sizeof(int));
    printf("Enter %d numbers\n",size);
    for(i=0;i<size;i++)
        scanf("%d",&a[i]);
    printf("The array recieved is :\n");
    for(i=0;i<size;i++)
        printf(" %d ", a[i]);
    i=0;
    printf("\n");
    for(i=0;i<size;i++)
    {
        if(a[i]==a[i+1])
        {
            j=i+1;
            while(a[i]==a[j])
            {
                a[j]=999;
                j++;
            }
            count++;
        }
    }
    while(count!=0)
    {
        for(i=0;i<size-1;i++)
        {
            j=i;
            if(a[j]==999)
            {
                a[j]=a[j+1];
                a[j+1]=999;
            }
        }
        count--;
    }
    printf("The new array is: \n");
    for(i=0;i<size;i++)
        printf(" %d ",a[i]);
    free(a);
    getch();
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you post your code? –  sampson-chen Dec 20 '12 at 22:55
1  
Edit your post and put your code in it so we can help you, please. –  cmc Dec 20 '12 at 23:03
    
I've edited the post so you can see my code. Thank you. –  Oria Gruber Dec 20 '12 at 23:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's a general approach that runs in O(n):

Assumption: The input array does not contain 999 (It's fine if it does, you just have to use a different sentinel value):

  • Iterate through the array once:
    • For each element, look ahead to the next one
    • If it's a duplicate to the current element, change it to 999
    • Keep looking ahead and marking duplicates as 999 until you hit a different element.
  • You want all the 999's at the end, so now, keep 2 separate pointers:
    • An index X to keep track of where the first 999 is in the array
    • Another index num to keep track of where we are in the swapping process
  • Iterate through the array again, swap all the valid numbers with 999 using these two pointers.

This might sound confusing, so here's a pseudo animation using one of your examples: (Using W as the sentinel in place of '999` for readability)

1,1,2,3,4,4,5,6,6,
1,W,2,3,4,4,5,6,6,
1,W,2,3,4,W,5,6,6,
1,W,2,3,4,W,5,6,W,
1,2,W,3,4,W,5,6,W,
1,2,3,W,4,W,5,6,W,
1,2,3,4,W,W,5,6,W,
1,2,3,4,5,W,W,6,W,
1,2,3,4,5,6,W,W,W,

And again, but labeling the W with numerical suffix this time so you can see which swaps are happening:

1,1,2,3,4,4,5,6,6,
1,W1,2,3,4,4,5,6,6,
1,W1,2,3,4,W2,5,6,6,
1,W1,2,3,4,W2,5,6,W3,
1,2,W1,3,4,W2,5,6,W3,
1,2,3,W1,4,W2,5,6,W3,
1,2,3,4,W1,W2,5,6,W3,
1,2,3,4,5,W2,W1,6,W3,
1,2,3,4,5,6,W1,W2,W3,
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Chen this is great stuff! But just one question, what's the algorithm for making the swaps at the end? I can put 999 on the doubles, I get that. But after I did that, whats the algorithm for the swaps? –  Oria Gruber Dec 20 '12 at 23:19
    
@OriaGruber There could be a name for it, but I'm not sure; I just thought of it now when I was looking at the examples. –  sampson-chen Dec 20 '12 at 23:22
    
I don't mean the name. I meant how do I do it? I do a for loop and if a[x]=999 i just until its at the last spot? how do i know when im done? –  Oria Gruber Dec 20 '12 at 23:24

Assuming this is for a school exercise, and you are not working for Google and need to remove duplicates of locations in a world map, your algorithm sounds about right.

For VERY large number of potential dublicates, and also assuming the list is sorted, you could use a method based on a search for the nearest larger elemnt, and then by measuring the distance between two elements, you may find that more effecient.

share|improve this answer
    
I've edited the code. Please review it as you wish. And thanks for all the help I didn't realize how quick a response I'd get. Yes this is for a school exercise. –  Oria Gruber Dec 20 '12 at 23:08
    
I would use while (j < size && ... (and the same type of change a few lines further down) this should be an else: if(a[i]==a[i+1]) You set j=1 a few places more than you need, I think. –  Mats Petersson Dec 20 '12 at 23:17

Easiest way to do this is to remove duplicates first, then fill the rest of the array with 999.

Removing duplicates is O(n), and filling an array is O(n).

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