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Say I have the following code:

Request.QueryString["ids"].Split('|');

If ids is not present in the query string this will throw an exception. Is there a generally accepted way to handle this type of situation. I think all of the following options would keep this from thorwing an error, but I'm wondering if one (or some different method entirely) is generally accepted as better.

string[] ids = (Request.QueryString["ids"] ?? "").Split('|'); 

or

string[] ids;
if(!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Request.QueryString["ids"]))
{
   ids = Request.QueryString["ids"].Split('|')
}

or

?

I think all of these will work, but they look sort of ugly. Is there a better* way?

*better = easier to read, faster, more efficient or all of the above.

share|improve this question
    
Easier to read, Faster, More Efficient. Pick One :) – RonaldBarzell Dec 21 '12 at 0:34
    
Your second option won't work, null as string is still null. – Lee Dec 21 '12 at 0:34
1  
The If(!String.IsNullOrEmpty one is the easiest to read - IMHO. Regarding speed is there a difference in the IL produced? – Jeremy Thompson Dec 21 '12 at 0:35
    
The soft cast (qs as string) will not work. It will still return null. The null-coalesce operator (??) appears to be the 'cleanest' solution IMHO. – Jason Whitted Dec 21 '12 at 0:35
    
@Lee, you were right. Removed null as string option. – Abe Miessler Dec 21 '12 at 0:37
up vote 9 down vote accepted

I like using an extension method for this:

public static string EmptyIfNull(this string self)
{
    return self ?? "";
}

Usage:

string[] ids = Request.QueryString["ids"].EmptyIfNull().Split('|');
share|improve this answer
    
+1: I do as well – horgh Dec 21 '12 at 0:54
1  
I don't like this. Null isn't an empty string and leads to a spurious entry in the split array. The better approach is to handle the null there and then and not to leave any assumptions to be dealt with downstream. – spender Dec 21 '12 at 1:04
2  
Split() returns a string[]. ToArray isn't necessary. – spender Dec 21 '12 at 1:05

Personally I'd use

string idStr = Request.QueryString["ids"];
ids = idStr == null ? new string[0] : idStr.Split("|");
share|improve this answer
    
Good. No spurious entry caused by empty strings. +1. If it were me, I'd probably test for string.IsNullOrEmpty, but it's not clear whether an empty string represents a useful value to the OP. – spender Dec 21 '12 at 1:06
string[] ids = (Request.QueryString["ids"] as string).Split('|');

This will fail in the same manner as Request.QueryString["ids"]

string[] ids;
if(!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Request.QueryString["ids"]))
{
   ids = Request.QueryString["ids"].Split('|')
}

Heavier and may call the data retrieval logic twice (and you might have side-effects done twice by error) => use a temporary to store the data but heavier.

string[] ids = (Request.QueryString["ids"] ?? "").Split('|'); 

Definetely the easiest, cleanest and more efficient way as the compiler will generate a temporary itself.

If you encounter this kind of processing a lot of time you can build your own plumbing library with a bunch of methods with fluent names and behaviors.

share|improve this answer

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