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I believe I've noticed that for certain Iterables (such as this IterableString class) either a new iterator is created or the iterator somehow resets to the start with every new foreach construct but that this does not seem to occur with other Iterables...

For example, if you run the following code:


import java.util.ArrayList;


public class test {


  public static void main(String args[]) {
    IterableString x = new IterableString("ONCE");

    System.out.println("***");
    for (char ch : x){
      System.out.println(ch);
    }

    System.out.println("***");
    for (char ch : x){
        System.out.println(ch);
     }

    ArrayList y = new  ArrayList();
    y.add('T');
    y.add('W');
    y.add('I');
    y.add('C');
    y.add('E');

    System.out.println("***");
    for (char ch : y){
        System.out.println(ch);
     }

    System.out.println("***");
    for (char ch : y){
        System.out.println(ch);
     }

    System.out.println();
  }
}

you will see the following output:


***
O
N
C
E
***
***
T
W
I
C
E
***
T
W
I
C
E

The second foreach loop with x seems to start off where it left off (after the last item), but the second foreach loop with y seems to start from the where it started the first time (at the first item). Why is this and how can we make Iterables that behave like the latter (ArrayLists)?

More concretely, how exactly would we modify a class like IterableString to work like the ArrayList?

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2  
what the heck is IterableString?? that unknown object might have something to do with the way the iterator is configured... –  mre Dec 21 '12 at 1:20
3  
The Javadoc for Iterable doesn't seem say much in order to impose that each call to iterator() returns a new Iterator - but that seems to be the accepted practice by the JDK (and sensible). So it looks like a "bug" by who ever created IterableString. –  Greg Kopff Dec 21 '12 at 1:23
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The class IterableString (as defined by your linked article) is both the Iterable and the Iterator. Whether or not that's a good idea is debatable - but a simple fix is:

  // This method implements Iterable.
  public Iterator<Character> iterator() {
    return new IterableString(this.str);
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I was thrown off by similar issues I've seen with other iterables (like this one where the nested iterator class had another issue with it needing to account for the fact that it was state-conscious of changing components in its outerclass). For some reason the seeming consistency of the error gave me the impression that there was something special going on with iterables like ArrayList as opposed to broken pieces in the non-standard iterables I was looking at. –  user1920345 Dec 21 '12 at 2:18
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An ArrayList is able to be iterated over in a java foreach loop because it implements the Iterable interface in Java. The Iterable interface outlines a method iterator which returns an iterator for the collection. Using a foreach loop in java uses the iterator from this method under the hood. Every time you create a new foreach loop, the ArrayList is providing a new iterator.

If you want to create a class that can be iterated over using a foreach loop in Java, you need to implement the Iterable interface and define how to iterate over the collection.

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1  
This still doesn't address the OPs question –  Code-Apprentice Dec 21 '12 at 1:27
    
I'm a little confused by your comment @Code-Guru. Perhaps I am misunderstanding the question but I outlined why an ArrayList has that behavior in a foreach loop and how to mimic that in a user-defined class. –  user1897691 Dec 21 '12 at 1:30
    
The question is why the IterableString class behaves differently than the ArrayList. –  Code-Apprentice Dec 21 '12 at 2:23
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