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I am trying SELECT FOR SHARE a set of rows in a table so that they are locked until the end of the transaction. I am using SQLAlchemy 0.7.9 to do this in a PostgreSQL 9.1.6 database. This is the python code in question:

NUM_TERMS = 10
conn = engine.connect()
get_terms = select([search_terms.c.term_id, search_terms.c.term],
                   and_(search_terms.c.lock==False,
                   search_terms.c.status==False),
                   order_by=search_terms.c.term,
                   limit=NUM_TERMS, for_update="read")
trans = conn.begin()
try:
    search_terms = conn.execute(get_terms).fetchall()
    for term in search_terms:
        lock_terms = update(search_terms).\
                     where(search_terms.c.term_id==term.term_id).\
                     values(lock=True)
        conn.execute(lock_terms)
    if trans.commit():
        <do things with the search terms>
except:
    trans.rollback()

The problem is the SQL query generated by the select code above is not FOR SHARE, it's FOR UPDATE:

SELECT search_terms.term_id, search_terms.term
FROM search_terms
WHERE search_terms.lock = :lock_1 AND search_terms.status = :status_1     
ORDER BY search_terms.term
LIMIT :param_1 FOR UPDATE

According to the SQLAlchemy API docs, under the "for_update" parameter description:

With the Postgresql dialect, the values “read” and "read_nowait" translate to FOR SHARE and FOR SHARE NOWAIT, respectively.

According to the above, the compiled SQL statement should be FOR SHARE, but it is not. Where is the error in my code?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

can't reproduce:

from sqlalchemy import *

m = MetaData()
t = Table('t', m, Column('x', Integer))

s = select([t], for_update="read")

from sqlalchemy.dialects import postgresql
print s.compile(dialect=postgresql.dialect())

e = create_engine("postgresql://scott:tiger@localhost/test", echo=True)
with e.begin() as conn:
    m.create_all(conn)
    conn.execute(s)

the output shows that both as a standalone compile as well as within a Postgresql conversation, we get FOR SHARE. Tested in 0.7.9 and 0.8.0b2. If you can provide a full runnable test case, that might shed more light:

SELECT t.x 
FROM t FOR SHARE
2012-12-20 23:53:33,670 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine select version()
2012-12-20 23:53:33,671 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine {}
2012-12-20 23:53:33,672 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine select current_schema()
2012-12-20 23:53:33,672 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine {}
2012-12-20 23:53:33,674 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine BEGIN (implicit)
2012-12-20 23:53:33,674 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine select relname from pg_class c join pg_namespace n on n.oid=c.relnamespace where n.nspname=current_schema() and relname=%(name)s
2012-12-20 23:53:33,675 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine {'name': u't'}
2012-12-20 23:53:33,676 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine SELECT t.x 
FROM t FOR SHARE
2012-12-20 23:53:33,676 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine {}
2012-12-20 23:53:33,676 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine COMMIT
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