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I am learning about vector. I try to implement a code that print the struct element of a vector as displayed below. Many resources in the internet only teach me a simple vector. I get stcuk in expression when to print it. However, any suggestion for improving the quality and elegance of the code is open, although the change is fundamental (in struct or looping).

Thank you very much.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

typedef struct _student {
string name;
int age;
vector <string> subject;
}student;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
  vector <student> x; //assmue at this point we do not know the number of students
  student y;

  //and I want to insert new information
  y.name ="John";
  y.age =9;
  y.subject.push_back("biology");
  y.subject.push_back("math");
  y.subject.push_back("art");
  x.push_back(y);       

  //get new information again
  //and I want to insert new information
  y.name ="Bon";
  y.age =12;
  y.subject.push_back("history");
  y.subject.push_back("physics");
  x.push_back(y);       

  // then I want display all data
  cout << "myvector contains:";

  for (int i=0; i<x.size(); i++)
  {   
      cout << "Student # " << i+1 <<endl;
      cout << "   name : " << x.at(i).name <<endl;  //Reference in the internet only display a simple vector --
      cout << "   age  : " << x.at(i).age <<endl;   //I get stuck to express this and next part
      cout <<"   Subject : ";
      for (int j =0; j < x.at(i).subject.size(); j++)
      {   
          cout << x.at(i).subject.at(j);
      }
      cout << endl;
cin.get();
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
In C++, struct student {...}; works just as well. –  chris Dec 21 '12 at 1:31
    
So its printing the string but not the int? –  Carl Saldanha Dec 21 '12 at 1:33
    
So what's the problem? Compiler error? Crash? Code review? –  chris Dec 21 '12 at 1:33
    
Copied/pasted and ran it here (with some modifications to make it standard C++ and improve output formatting) and it seems fine. What's the problem you're having? –  Carl Norum Dec 21 '12 at 1:35
    
at this line : cout << " name : " << x.at(i).name <<endl; –  user1917485 Dec 21 '12 at 1:37
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3 Answers

Here, added some comments and stuff. Not sure if this is what you were looking for, but here it is.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string> // string would be welcome here!

struct _student // the typedef thing is not necessary in C++
{
    std::string            name; // i find this "using namespace ..." thing a bad habit, it can make code harder to read
    int                            age;
    std::vector<std::string>       subject;
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::vector<student>    x;
    student                 y;
    size_t                  size; // calling vector.size() every iterations is a bad idea, performance-wise
    size_t                  size_subj; // same

    y.name = "John";
    y.age = 9;
    y.subject.push_back("biology");
    y.subject.push_back("math");
    y.subject.push_back("art");
    x.push_back(y);     

    y.name = "Bon";
    y.age = 12;
    y.subject.clear(); // clear subjects of the other student
    y.subject.push_back("history");
    y.subject.push_back("physics");
    x.push_back(y);     

    std::cout << "my vector contains:";
    for (int i = 0, size = x.size(); i < size; ++i)
    {
        size_subj = x[i].subject.size();
        // I prefer using operator[] when I'm sure nothing can go wrong
        std::cout << "Student # " << i + 1 <<endl;
        std::cout << "\tname: " << x[i].name <<endl;
        std::cout << "\tage: " << x[i].age <<endl;
        std::cout << "\tSubjects: ";
        for (int j = 0; j < size_subj; ++j)   
            std::cout << x[i].subject[j];
        std::cout << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

Finally, using a std::vector< std::string* > or std::vector< std::string& > could be a better idea performance-wise, depending on what you are planning to do with it later.

share|improve this answer
    
@cms, Thank you for your code, I have implement it -- with some correction --, I get the essence what you mean. By the way, why you think that "using namepace" is bad? A lot of sources that I find , use this syle. Also , it is an efficient way to write code, isn't it? –  user1917485 Dec 21 '12 at 1:58
    
When you'll start working on bigger projects, with a lot of namespaces (half of them not even coded by you), it can become pretty hard to understand what does a snippet do if you have to look for the corresponding "using namespace..." everytime. –  cmc Dec 21 '12 at 2:12
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There is no real question here, so I'm assuming you are asking for "code review" The "neat" way is of course to create an operator<< that takes your inner structure.

Aside from that, you may want to look at using iterators to walk your way through your vector - that way, you should be able to change your vector for any other container type without having to change the loop(s) that print things.

Use longer variable names than x and y for your vector and temporary student.

Use setw to print fields at the same width every time.

I'm sure there are plenty of other suggestions too.

share|improve this answer
    
I absolutely agree with all these suggestions, just remember that using iterators is awfully slower than using operator[]. (I've recently doubled my performances on a neural network, just by removing iterators..!) –  cmc Dec 21 '12 at 2:17
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As the comments point to, it turns out that you're not including the string header file.

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