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I am using a logical matrix to select and order the indices of corresponding elements in a numerical matrix (both have identical dimensions). For example,

 x <- c(FALSE, TRUE, TRUE, FALSE, TRUE, TRUE, FALSE, TRUE, TRUE, FALSE)
 y <- c(7, 10, 3, 1, 6, 8, 2, 11, 1, 5)

 order(y[x],decreasing=TRUE)
 [1] 5 1 4 3 2 6 

 # NOTE: these are the **indices** of the ordered vector y[x] now containing
 # only six elements (10,3,6,8,11,1)

Great. Works as it should. However, when I perform the operation on a matrix, I obtained an unexpected result:

 x <- matrix(rep(c(F,T,T),10), nrow=10)

        [,1]  [,2]  [,3]
  [1,] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
  [2,]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
  [3,]  TRUE FALSE  TRUE
  [4,] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
  [5,]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
  [6,]  TRUE FALSE  TRUE
  [7,] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
  [8,]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
  [9,]  TRUE FALSE  TRUE
 [10,] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE

 y <- matrix( round(rnorm(30,sample(10))), ncol=3)

       [,1] [,2] [,3]
  [1,]    7    7    6
  [2,]   10   12    8
  [3,]    3    5    6
  [4,]    1    1    0
  [5,]    6    5    6
  [6,]    8    7    7
  [7,]    2    3    4
  [8,]   11    8    9
  [9,]    1    2    1
 [10,]    5    5    5

  y<-structure(c(7, 10, 3, 1, 6, 8, 2, 11, 1, 5, 7, 12, 5, 1, 5, 7, 
  3, 8, 2, 5, 6, 8, 6, 0, 6, 7, 4, 9, 1, 5), .Dim = c(10L, 3L))

 order(y[x], decreasing=TRUE)
 [1]  8  5  1  4 12  7 17  3 14 15 10 13 20 18  2 11  6  9 19 16

It seems that as the comparison returns vectors of unequal length (depends on logical TRUE in x) I am breaking the intended behavior of the operation. However,

 y[x]
 [1] 10  3  6  8 11  1  7 12  1  5  3  8  5  6  6  0  7  4  1  5

yields what I expect with no ordering; order(y[x]) is performed on all TRUE elements. Is this a bug? I would (naively) expect that it would perform the operation on each column separately and concatenate the result like above.

In any case, is there a reasonable way to partition asymmetric results into a matrix? I considered padding each vector with NAs to max dim(x) and then cbind into a matrix (see below). Seems like a mess as I would lose vectorization. Any more elegant ideas/hints?

Thanks.

#Desired result
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    5    2    4
[2,]    1    6    1
[3,]    4    1    2
[4,]    3    4    7
[5,]    2    7    5
[6,]    6    5    6
[7,]   NA    3    3
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2 Answers 2

I am not sure why you want to keep a matrix structure with NAs. Couldn't you use a list of lists? In that case you could transform your matrices into data frames and use mapply. That's how you execute a function on each column independently in R.

my.order <- function(x, y) order(y[x],decreasing=TRUE)
mapply(my.order, as.data.frame(x), as.data.frame(y))

$V1
[1] 5 1 4 3 2 6

$V2
[1] 2 6 1 4 7 5 3

$V3
[1] 4 1 2 7 5 6 3

You can always pad each element and coerce the list to a data frame if you really need to.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the suggestion about using lists. I'll give it a go on some real data sets - sizes in the tens of millions - and report on execution speed. –  user1789784 Dec 21 '12 at 14:27
    
Okay, let us know. I am not aware that there is a vectorized version of order, and if you worry about performance, you might have to write the code and the loop in a compiled language. You might want to look at the package Rcpp, which allows to write and compile C++ code in R scripts. –  Arnaud Amzallag Dec 21 '12 at 18:22

y[x] returns

[1]  8  5  1  4 12  7 17  3 14 15 10 13 20 18  2 11  6  9 19 16

This is a numeric vector.

order(y[x]) is therefore working on a numeric vector. It has no memory that y and x were matrices and no ability to read your mind that it should be applied columnwise and to a matrix that was once 3 columns and that you want to pad it with NA values.

You could use is.na<- and return a list (similar to the answer posted while I was writing this)

newy <- y

is.na(newy) <- !x

apply(newy, 2,function(x) order(na.omit(x), decreasing = TRUE))

[[1]]
[1] 5 1 4 3 2 6

[[2]]
[1] 2 6 1 4 7 5 3

[[3]]
[1] 4 1 2 7 5 6 3
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the suggestion above. I'll give it a go on some real data sets - sizes in the tens of millions - and report execution speed for both approaches. –  user1789784 Dec 21 '12 at 14:28

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