Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been using the following function to get regular parameters from the current url:

function getURLParameter(name) {
    return decodeURI(
        (RegExp(name + '=' + '(.+?)(&|$)').exec(location.search)||[,null])[1]
    );
}

However, I want to get the GET parameter 'imgurl' from a string that will follow the format for the url here.

When I change that function to handle regular strings:

function getURLParameter(name, givenstring) {
    return decodeURI(
        (RegExp(name + '=' + '(.+?)(&|$)').exec(givenstring.search)||[,null])[1]
    );
}

It returns null. I even made a userscript go to the url that I just gave you and I used the first function to try to get that 'imgurl' parameter, but it was unable to do so. I also got rid of the colons in that url, but obviously that did nothing.

What is throwing this function off about this string format?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

location.search is the query-string part of the current URL. If you want to replace that with an arbitrary string variable givenstring, then you would replace location.search with givenstring, not with givenstring.search. So:

function getURLParameter(name, givenstring) {
    return decodeURI(
        (RegExp(name + '=' + '(.+?)(&|$)').exec(givenstring)||[,null])[1]
    );
}

By the way, your function will misbehave if (for example) the string is foobar=baz&bar=bip and the parameter of interest is bar. It will find the first instance of bar=..., which in this case is bar=baz rather than bar=bip. You can fix that by using (^|&):

function getURLParameter(name, givenstring) {
    return decodeURI(
        (RegExp('(^|&)' + name + '=(.+?)(&|$)').exec(givenstring)||[,,null])[2]
    );
}

(Your function will also misbehave if name has any special characters in it — either special in URLs or special in regexes — but I'm guessing that you have enough control over name that you can make certain that's not going to be an issue?)

share|improve this answer
    
Works great! I don't have much experience with Javascript regex so I just thought .search had something to do with executing regex. –  Mark Lyons Dec 21 '12 at 3:04
    
@MarkLyons: That makes sense. There is a regex-related .search -- it's a property of strings, see developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/… -- but as it happens, that's not what location.search refers to, because location is not a string. –  ruakh Dec 21 '12 at 3:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.