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This is bound to beg design questions, but I want to serialize or hash a closure in PHP such that I have a unique identifier for that closure.

I don't need to be able to call the closure from that, I just need a unique identifier for it that is accessible from inside and outside of the closure itself, i.e. a method that accepts a closer will need to generate an id for that closure, and the closure itself will need to be able to generate that same id

Things I've tried so far:

$someClass = new SomeClass();

$closure1 = $someClass->closure();

print $closure1();
// Outputs: I am a closure: {closure}

print $someClass->closure();
// Outputs: Catchable fatal error: Object of class Closure could not be converted to string

print serialize($closure1);
// Outputs: Fatal error: Uncaught exception 'Exception' with message 'Serialization of 'Closure' is not allowed'

class SomeClass
{
    function closure()
    {
        return function () { return 'I am a closure: ' . __FUNCTION__; };
    }
}

The Reflection API doesn't seem to offer anything I might be able to use to create an ID either.

share|improve this question
    
Well, consider your design questioned ;) "Closure" is an anonymous function here? –  dualed Dec 21 '12 at 3:04
    
Yes a closure is an anonymous function...I still want a way to make a hash of it though ;) –  Toby Dec 21 '12 at 3:15
    
in which scope is this hash to be unique? –  dualed Dec 21 '12 at 3:23
    
I need to be able to obtain the hash from within the closure itself, and from within a method that accepts the closure as a paramater –  Toby Dec 21 '12 at 3:29
2  
If you do not need serialization and this is all in one request, try with spl_object_hash. –  hakre Dec 21 '12 at 3:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+100

My solution is more general and respects static parameters for closure. To make the trick, you can pass a reference to the closure inside the closure:

class ClosureHash
{
    /**
     * List of hashes
     *
     * @var SplObjectStorage
     */
    protected static $hashes = null;

    /**
     * Returns a hash for closure
     *
     * @param callable $closure
     *
     * @return string
     */
    public static function from(Closure $closure)
    {
        if (!self::$hashes) {
            self::$hashes = new SplObjectStorage();
        }

        if (!isset(self::$hashes[$closure])) {
            $ref  = new ReflectionFunction($closure);
            $file = new SplFileObject($ref->getFileName());
            $file->seek($ref->getStartLine()-1);
            $content = '';
            while ($file->key() < $ref->getEndLine()) {
                $content .= $file->current();
                $file->next();
            }
            self::$hashes[$closure] = md5(json_encode(array(
                $content,
                $ref->getStaticVariables()
            )));
        }
        return self::$hashes[$closure];
    }
}

class Test {

    public function hello($greeting)
    {
        $closure = function ($message) use ($greeting, &$closure) {
            echo "Inside: ", ClosureHash::from($closure), PHP_EOL, "<br>" ;
        };
        return $closure;
    }
}

$obj = new Test();

$closure = $obj->hello('Hello');
$closure('PHP');
echo "Outside: ", ClosureHash::from($closure), PHP_EOL, "<br>";

$another = $obj->hello('Bonjour');
$another('PHP');
echo "Outside: ", ClosureHash::from($another), PHP_EOL, "<br>";
share|improve this answer

You could all that you need write your own, your own closures having a getId() or getHash() or whatever.

Example (Demo):

1: Hello world
2: Hello world

First closure (ID: 1), ID read in calling context. Second closure (ID: 2), ID read from within the closure (where self-reference).

Code:

<?php
/**
 * @link http://stackoverflow.com/questions/13983714/serialize-or-hash-a-closure-in-php
 */

class IdClosure
{
    private $callback;
    private $id;

    private static $sequence = 0;

    final public function __construct(Callable $callback) {
        $this->callback = $callback;
        $this->id = ++IdClosure::$sequence;
    }

    public function __invoke() {
        return call_user_func_array($this->callback, func_get_args());
    }

    public function getId() {
        return $this->id;
    }
}

$hello = new IdClosure(function($text) { echo "Hello $text\n";});
echo $hello->getId(), ": ", $hello('world');

$hello2 = new IdClosure(function($text) use (&$hello2) { echo $hello2->getId(), ": Hello $text\n";} );
$hello2('world');

I have no clue if that suits your needs, maybe it gives you some ideas. I suggested spl_object_hash but didn't understood the discussion much why it does not or in the end then does work.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is/was that the function spl_object_hash can return duplicate values if other object have already been destroyed and collected by the GC. This is because spl_object_hash is only unique for existing objects. (says so in the manual!) This may never happen, or it may happen a lot. I will depend strongly on the code, and so may produce weird effects. –  dualed Dec 21 '12 at 12:44
    
@dualed: Yes, that behavior of spl_object_hash is known. You need to keep a collection of objects then to make use of the hashes, see as well: php.net/splobjectstorage –  hakre Dec 21 '12 at 12:45
    
BTW: The implementation here does not have duplicate IDs for the closures. –  hakre Dec 21 '12 at 12:56
    
Yes you are right, it follows more or less the same principle as my idea with $this-injection. I like your way better though because you can type-hint it. I don't understand however why you have to extend the class, you inject the callback anyway. I just don't see the benefit of the abstract class here –  dualed Dec 21 '12 at 13:26
1  
@dualed: Ah right, I probably was going a bit far off ;) Also the callback should be private as well. I updated the answer to correct that. Thanks for your feedback, I might have tried something different first and thats why I had it that way. But for the example given it looks superfluous I have to admit ;) –  hakre Dec 21 '12 at 13:53

PHP anonymous functions are exposed as instances of the Closure class. As they're basically objects, spl_object_hash will return a unique identifier when handed one. From the PHP interactive prompt:

php > $a = function() { echo "I am A!"; };
php > $b = function() { echo "I am B!"; };
php >
php >
php > echo spl_object_hash($a), "\n", spl_object_hash($b), "\n";
000000004f2ef15d000000003b2d5c60
000000004f2ef15c000000003b2d5c60

Those identifiers might look the same, but they differ by one letter in the middle.

The identifier is good only for that request, so expect it to change between calls, even if the function and any use'd variables don't change.

share|improve this answer
    
have you tried it? ;) –  dualed Dec 21 '12 at 4:02
    
Yes, I did, and it gave me a fright. I forgot that it likes adding the unique bit in the middle of the identifier instead of at the end. I thought it was returning the same identifier every time, but was incorrect. Phew! –  Charles Dec 21 '12 at 4:26
    
I'm liking this, for some reason I thought I needed reflection to get the Closure object back (as in the solution I posted: stackoverflow.com/a/13984282/360967), but that doesn't seem to be the case. –  Toby Dec 21 '12 at 4:39
1  
I'm getting the same result as @Charles - spl_object_hash(function() {}) and spl_object_hash(function() {}) returns the same hash every time, but $fn = function() { }; $fn2 = function() { }; return different hashes –  Toby Dec 21 '12 at 4:49
1  
@Toby: Yes, read the documentation (php.net/manual/en/function.spl-object-hash.php) "Note: When an object is destroyed, its hash may be reused for other objects." It's basically true of an address for an object too. Obviously, you should only compare hashes of objects that you know still exist. –  newacct Dec 21 '12 at 19:31

Ok, here is the only thing I can think of:

<?php
$f = function() {
}
$rf = new ReflectionFunction($f)
$pseudounique = $rf->getFileName().$rf->getEndLine();
?>

If you like, you can hash it with md5 or whatnot. If the function is generated from a string however, you should seed that with a uniqid()

share|improve this answer
    
are they defined in the same line? –  dualed Dec 21 '12 at 4:18
    
Never mind last comment (deleted). This is the closest so far, I was working on something similar using Reflection with @hakre's suggestion of spl_object_hash() - I'll keep trying with that and if nothing comes of it I'll go with this, even though it seems a bit hacky –  Toby Dec 21 '12 at 4:20
    
It is hacky, yes ;) tell me your target php version though, Idea incoming; or just tell me if php 5.4 is possible –  dualed Dec 21 '12 at 4:20
    
I'm liking this... $someClass = new SomeClass(); $closure = $someClass->closure(); $closure2 = $someClass->closure2(); $rf = new ReflectionFunction($closure); $rf2 = new ReflectionFunction($closure); print spl_object_hash($rf); // Outputs: 000000007ddc37c8000000003b230216 print spl_object_hash($rf2); // Outputs: 000000007ddc37c9000000003b230216 class SomeClass { function closure() { return function () { return 'I am closure: ' . __FUNCTION__; }; } function closure2() { return function () { return 'I am closure: ' . __FUNCTION__; }; } } –  Toby Dec 21 '12 at 4:28

It sounds like you want to generate a signature. Creating a signature from outside the closure will be nearly impossible to reproduce if the closure accepts any parameters. The data passed in will change the generated signature.

$someClass = new SomeClass();
$closure1 = $someClass->closure();
$closure1_id = md5(print_r($closure1, true));

Even if your closure doesn't accept parameters, you still have the problem of storing and persisting the signature inside the closure. You might be able to do something with a static variable inside the closure so it only initializes once and retains the "signature". But that gets messy on how to retrieve it.

It really sounds like you want a class, not a closure. It would solve all of these problems. You could pass in a "salt" on instantiation and have it generate a signature using the salt (i.e. a random number). That would make the signature unique. You could then retain that salt, recreate a class using the exact same constructor parameters (i.e. salt) and compare that with the signature on file in the already created class.

share|improve this answer
    
var_dump is probably a better idea here than print_r. At least on my local copy, the output from print_r is always "Closure Object()", while the var_dump includes the object number. –  Charles Dec 21 '12 at 3:51
    
agreed, var_dump would be better. –  Brent Baisley Dec 21 '12 at 4:14

Possible solution arrived at with the help of @hakre and @dualed:

$someClass = new SomeClass();

$closure = $someClass->closure();
$closure2 = $someClass->closure2();

$rf = new ReflectionFunction($closure);
$rf2 = new ReflectionFunction($closure2);

print spl_object_hash($rf); // Outputs: 000000007ddc37c8000000003b230216
print spl_object_hash($rf2); // Outputs: 000000007ddc37c9000000003b230216

class SomeClass
{
    function closure()
    {
        return function () { return 'I am closure: ' . __FUNCTION__; };
    }

    function closure2()
    {
        return function () { return 'I am closure: ' . __FUNCTION__; };
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
but does it return the same hash when you create a 2nd reflectionfunction from the same closure? Not that I want to talk down your solution –  dualed Dec 21 '12 at 4:36

The Superclosure provides a convenience class that allows you to serialize/unserialize closures, among other things.

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