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(question revised): So far, the answers all include a single thread re-entering the lock region linearly, through things like recursion, where you can trace the steps of a single thread entering the lock twice. But is it possible somehow, for a single thread (perhaps from the ThreadPool, perhaps as a result of timer events or async events or a thread going to sleep and being awaken/reused in some other chunk of code separately) to somehow be spawned in two different places independently of each other, and hence, run into the lock re-entrance problem when the developer didn't expect it by simply reading their own code?

In the ThreadPool Class Remarks (click here) the Remarks seem to suggest that sleeping threads should be reused when they're not in use, or otherwise wasted by sleeping.

But on the Monitor.Enter reference page (click here) they say "It is legal for the same thread to invoke Enter more than once without it blocking." So I figure there must be something I'm supposed to be careful to avoid. What is it? How is it even possible for a single thread to enter the same lock region twice?

Suppose you have some lock region that takes an unfortunately long time. This might be realistic, for example, if you access some memory that has been paged out (or whatever.) The thread in the locked region might go to sleep or something. Does the same thread become eligible to run more code, which might accidentally step into the same lock region? The following does NOT, in my testing, get multiple instances of the same thread to run into the same lock region.

So how does one produce the problem? What exactly do you need to be careful to avoid?

class myClass
{
    private object myLockObject;
    public myClass()
    {
        this.myLockObject = new object();
        int[] myIntArray = new int[100];               // Just create a bunch of things so I may easily launch a bunch of Parallel things
        Array.Clear(myIntArray, 0, myIntArray.Length); // Just create a bunch of things so I may easily launch a bunch of Parallel things
        Parallel.ForEach<int>(myIntArray, i => MyParallelMethod());
    }
    private void MyParallelMethod()
    {
        lock (this.myLockObject)
        {
            Console.Error.WriteLine("ThreadId " + Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId.ToString() + " starting...");
            Thread.Sleep(100);
            Console.Error.WriteLine("ThreadId " + Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId.ToString() + " finished.");
        }
    }
}
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1  
First: you'd be better served by asking a new question rather than revising an old one. Second, "is it possible for a single thread to somehow be spawned in two different places independently of each other?" No; the definition of a thread is that it is a single point of control. If you have two independent points of control then you have two threads. (This ignores some subtleties involving "lightweight threads", aka "fibers"; that's quite an advanced topic that you need not be concerned about at this time.) –  Eric Lippert Dec 21 '12 at 17:38
    
@EricLippert your comment here seems to me, the best "answer." ThreadPool threads cannot be reused elsewhere just because they went to sleep; they need to finish before they're reused. A thread that is taking a long time in a lock region does not become eligible to run more code at some other independent point of control. The only way to experience lock re-entry is by recursion or executing methods or delegates inside a lock that re-enter the lock. If you want to post something like that as an answer, I'll mark it as the accepted answer. –  Edward Ned Harvey Dec 21 '12 at 19:46

6 Answers 6

Suppose you have a queue that contains actions:

public static Queue<Action> q = whatever;

Suppose Queue<T> has a method Dequeue that returns a bool indicating whether the queue could be successfully dequeued.

And suppose you have a loop:

static void Main()
{
    q.Add(M);
    q.Add(M);
    Action action;
    while(q.Dequeue(out action)) 
      action();
}
static object lockObject = new object();
static void M()
{
    Action action;
    lock(lockObject) 
    { 
        if (q.Dequeue(out action))
            action();
    }
}

Clearly the main thread enters the lock in M twice; this code is re-entrant. That is, it enters itself, through an indirect recursion.

Does this code look implausible to you? It should not. This is how Windows works. Every window has a message queue, and when a message queue is "pumped", methods are called corresponding to those messages. When you click a button, a message goes in the message queue; when the queue is pumped, the click handler corresponding to that message gets invoked.

It is therefore extremely common, and extremely dangerous, to write Windows programs where a lock contains a call to a method which pumps a message loop. If you got into that lock as a result of handling a message in the first place, and if the message is in the queue twice, then the code will enter itself indirectly, and that can cause all manner of craziness.

The way to eliminate this is (1) never do anything even slightly complicated inside a lock, and (2) when you are handling a message, disable the handler until the message is handled.

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Re-Entrance is possible if you have a structure like so:

Object lockObject = new Object(); 

void Foo(bool recurse) 
{
  lock(lockObject)
   { 
       Console.WriteLine("In Lock"); 
       if (recurse)  { foo(false); }
   }
}

While this is a pretty simplistic example, it's possible in many scenarios where you have interdependent or recursive behaviour.

For example:

  • ComponentA.Add(): locks a common 'ComponentA' object, adds new item to ComponentB.
  • ComponentB.OnNewItem(): new item triggers data-validation on each item in list.
  • ComponentA.ValidateItem(): locks a common 'ComponentA' object to validate the item.

Same-thread re-entry on the same lock is needed to ensure you don't get deadlocks occurring with your own code.

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IMHO, Re-entering a lock is not something you need to take care to avoid (given many people's mental model of locking this is, at best, dangerous, see Edit below). The point of the documentation is to explain that a thread cannot block itself using Monitor.Enter. This is not always the case with all synchronization mechanisms, frameworks, and languages. Some have non-reentrant synchronization in which case you have to be careful that a thread doesn't block itself. What you do need to be careful about is always calling Monitor.Exit for every Monitor.Enter call. The lock keyword does this for you automatically.

A trivial example with re-entrance:

private object locker = new object();

public void Method()
{
  lock(locker)
  {
    lock(locker) { Console.WriteLine("Re-entered the lock."); }
  }
}

The thread has entered the lock on the same object twice so it must be released twice. Usually it is not so obvious and there are various methods calling each other that synchronize on the same object. The point is that you don't have to worry about a thread blocking itself.

That said you should generally try to minimize the amount the time you need to hold a lock. Acquiring a lock is not computationally expensive, contrary to what you may hear (it is on the order of a few nanoseconds). Lock contention is what is expensive.

Edit

Please read Eric's comments below for additional details, but the summary is that when you see a lock your interpretation of it should be that "all activations of this code block are associated with a single thread", and not, as it is commonly interpreted, "all activations of this code block execute as a single atomic unit".

For example:

public static void Main()
{
  Method();
}

private static int i = 0;
private static object locker = new object();
public static void Method()
{
  lock(locker)
  {
    int j = ++i;

    if (i < 2)
    {
      Method();
    }

    if (i != j)
    {
      throw new Exception("Boom!");
    }
  }
}

Obviously, this program blows up. Without the lock, it is the same result. The danger is that the lock leads you into a false sense of security that nothing could modify state on you between initializing j and evaluating the if. The problem is that you (perhaps unintentionally) have Method recursing into itself and the lock won't stop that. As Eric points out in his answer, you might not realize the problem until one day someone queues up too many actions simultaneously.

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I'm +1'ing this comment because somebody -1'd it without any explanation. There's nothing wrong with this comment, and it certainly doesn't deserve to have score -1 –  Edward Ned Harvey Dec 21 '12 at 12:22
    
@EdwardNedHarvey: Of course there is something wrong with this answer. The first sentence is terrible advice. Re-entrancy is incredibly dangerous and confusing because most programs are not written to deal with it correctly, and it can cause the worst kinds of hard-to-reproduce, hard-to-debug bugs. The final paragraph, by contrast, is pure gold awesomeness. –  Eric Lippert Dec 21 '12 at 15:49
    
@EricLippert Is the issue that when one sees a lock it is often assumed that the code in that block is executed "atomically"? Then re-entry occurs inadvertently (usually through some layer of indirection, as you point out in your answer) and some of the statements are executed again before the initial call completes. –  mike z Dec 21 '12 at 16:40
    
@mikez: Correct. Now, it is worth pointing out that re-entrant code in Windows can happen even without locks. It is just particularly nasty with locks because many people assume, incorrectly, that "in a lock" means "there is at most one activation of this code at any one time" when in fact it means "every current activation of this code is associated with the same thread". –  Eric Lippert Dec 21 '12 at 17:22
    
@EricLippert Thanks! I've updated my answer based on your comments. –  mike z Dec 21 '12 at 20:21

One of the more subtle ways you can recurse into a lock block is in GUI frameworks. For example, you can asynchronously invoke code on a single UI thread (a Form class)

private object locker = new Object();
public void Method(int a)
{
    lock (locker)
    {
        this.BeginInvoke((MethodInvoker) (() => Method(a)));
    }
}

Of course, this also puts in an infinite loop; you'd likely have a condition by which you'd want to recurse at which point you wouldn't have an infinite loop.

Using lock is not a good way to sleep/awaken threads. I would simply use existing frameworks like Task Parallel Library (TPL) to simply create abstract tasks (see Task) to creates and the underlying framework handles creating new threads and sleeping them when needed.

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I'm interested in this answer because it's approaching a situation where you might not expect your lock region to be re-entered. When you BeginInvoke, you are running your own thread on somebody else's code, right? So maybe a clearer example would have someClass written by Bob, gets lock and invokes a method from anotherClass written by Sally, which also gets lock. Is that possible? Or plausible? –  Edward Ned Harvey Dec 21 '12 at 12:36
    
@EdwardNedHarvey Well, "it depends". BeginInvoke ensures the delegate is always called on the UI thread. If this method (Method) is invoked because of a UI action (like a button press) it will be invoked on the UI thread. Thus, BeginInvoke asynchronously invokes Method on the same thread--which gives the possibility of re-entering the lock block. You could use Invoke to guarantee that the lock block is re-entered... –  Peter Ritchie Dec 21 '12 at 16:08
    
If Method isn't run on the UI thread, then the lock block won't be re-entered. And in the case of using Invoke instead of BeginInvoke you'd have a deadlock. –  Peter Ritchie Dec 21 '12 at 16:09
    
But, you wouldn't normally call BeginInvoke/Invoke from a non UI class--so it's less likely for this to occur in multiple classes. But, of course, that doesn't mean it can't. Anyone is free to make use of UI classes and methods wherever they want, regardless of how stupid it might be. –  Peter Ritchie Dec 21 '12 at 16:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

ThreadPool threads cannot be reused elsewhere just because they went to sleep; they need to finish before they're reused. A thread that is taking a long time in a lock region does not become eligible to run more code at some other independent point of control. The only way to experience lock re-entry is by recursion or executing methods or delegates inside a lock that re-enter the lock.

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Let's think about something other than recursion.
In some of business logics, they would like to control the behaviors of synchronization. One of these patterns, they invoke Monitor.Enter somewhere and would like to invoke Monitor.Exit elsewhere later. Here is the code to get the idea about that:

public partial class Infinity: IEnumerable<int> {
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }

    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator() {
        for(; ; )
            yield return ~0;
    }

    public static readonly Infinity Enumerable=new Infinity();
}

public partial class YourClass {
    void ReleaseLock() {
        for(; lockCount-->0; Monitor.Exit(yourLockObject))
            ;
    }

    void GetLocked() {
        Monitor.Enter(yourLockObject);
        ++lockCount;
    }

    void YourParallelMethod(int x) {
        GetLocked();
        Debug.Print("lockCount={0}", lockCount);
    }

    public static void PeformTest() {
        new Thread(
            () => {
                var threadCurrent=Thread.CurrentThread;
                Debug.Print("ThreadId {0} starting...", threadCurrent.ManagedThreadId);

                var intanceOfYourClass=new YourClass();

                // Parallel.ForEach(Infinity.Enumerable, intanceOfYourClass.YourParallelMethod);
                foreach(var i in Enumerable.Range(0, 123))
                    intanceOfYourClass.YourParallelMethod(i);

                intanceOfYourClass.ReleaseLock();

                Monitor.Exit(intanceOfYourClass.yourLockObject); // here SynchronizationLockException thrown
                Debug.Print("ThreadId {0} finished. ", threadCurrent.ManagedThreadId);
            }
            ).Start();
    }

    object yourLockObject=new object();
    int lockCount;
}

If you invoke YourClass.PeformTest(), and get a lockCount greater than 1, you've reentered; not necessarily be concurrent.
If it was not safe for reentrancy, you will get stuck in the foreach loop.
In the code block where Monitor.Exit(intanceOfYourClass.yourLockObject) will throw you a SynchronizationLockException, it is because we are trying to invoke Exit more than the times it have entered. If you are about to use the lock keyword, you possibly would not encounter this situation except directly or indirectly of recursive calls. I guess that's why the lock keyword was provided: it prevents the Monitor.Exit to be omitted in a careless manner.
I remarked the calling of Parallel.ForEach, if you are interested then you can test it for fun.

To test the code, .Net Framework 4.0 is the least requirement, and following additional name spaces are required, too:

using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Threading;
using System.Collections;

Have fun.

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