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I'm currently checking up on our JBoss AS7.1 server configuration and I discovered these two previously-configured files in our jboss/standalone/bin directory:

  • standalone.conf
  • standalone.conf.bat

Now I'm interested in tweaking our JAVA_OPTS and both the config files have a location where the parameters are set. From a quick Google search I think standalone.conf.bat is the usual file for setting these. But I'm not sure what the standalone.conf file is doing here. Do I only need to modify standalone.conf.bat or is there any configuration ordering I should take note of when modifying these two files?

Update:

The relevant JBoss documentation that answers this can be found here: https://docs.jboss.org/author/display/AS71/JVM+settings

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I also have the original standalone.bat file in my bin directory, from what I gathered in Jboss forums, the the bat file takes its configuration parameters from standalone.conf.bat –  Jensen Ching Dec 21 '12 at 3:19
4  
The bat file is for Windows environments, the non-bat file is for *Nix. If you look through the startup scripts you will notice that standalone.bat will 'include' standalone.conf.bat when run, and standalone.sh will include standalone.conf. –  Perception Dec 21 '12 at 3:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you are running this on Windows then you only really need to worry about modifying the standalone.conf.bat file. The other file (standalone.conf) is only used by *Nix environments.

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Yes standalone.conf is used to change java options in Unix/Linux. Check this post for more details : http://mariemjabloun.blogspot.com/2014/11/jboss-7-set-javaopts-in-jboss.html

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