Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got records of items in a table. The items are a mix of records that begin with letters and numbers. I can't get them to sort correctly (Alphabetically, numbers on top). Here's what I'm using to call the table.

SELECT * FROM `cog_name` ORDER BY `cog_name`.`name` ASC

Shouldn't this work? I'm getting a large part of the entries with numbers at the top, then alphabetized records below that. HOWEVER, about halfway down, it starts "re-listing" another set in alphabetical order.

Example query result:
SELECT * FROM `cog_name` ORDER BY `cog_name`.`name` ASC
--------
name
--------
1 car
2 horse
3 rocket
apple
banana
carrot
1 car
2 horse
3 rocket
apple
banana
carrot

Entries are all unique names, unlike my example.

share|improve this question
4  
Any whitespace at the start of the field? –  Michael Berkowski Dec 21 '12 at 3:50
    
Might you have spaces, linebreaks or tabs prefixing the first set of alphabetic entries? –  joostschouten Dec 21 '12 at 3:51
    
To get a clearer picture of what's going on, you might try running SELECT name, ORD(name) FROM cog_name ORDER BY name ASC. The ORD(name) part will give the character-code of the first character in name, letting you see if there's any leading whitespace (as Michael Berkowski suggests) or any other weirdness like that. –  ruakh Dec 21 '12 at 3:54
    
how about trying something like "select name, trim(name) from cog_name order by trim(name)"? That should get rid of trailing or leading spaces. –  kermit Dec 21 '12 at 4:03
1  
to see where there are problems, do a "select concat("|",name,"|") ... " then whitspace will show up. –  MortenSickel Dec 21 '12 at 8:43

1 Answer 1

You can use the TRIM function:

SELECT TRIM(name) FROM `cog_name` ORDER BY TRIM(name) ASC

That ought to do it!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.