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Currently I have data that looks like this:

3-150
2-151
4-152
5-154
7-154
1-155
9-155
6-156

This is just artificial "tick" data, with the first representing the value of the tick and the second representing "seconds past midnight"

So for stock data, I need to sort this data into "bars". That is I need to group together all the bars for a given time.

An example would be 4 second bars. Ticks from 0-3 seconds past midnight would be 1 bar, 4-7 seconds past midnight would be another bar.

I have conduit/sink that looks like this that will compute 1 bar size:

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}

import Data.Maybe (isJust, fromJust)
import qualified Data.ByteString.Char8 as C
import Control.Applicative ((<$>), (<*>))

import Data.Conduit -- the core library
import qualified Data.Conduit.List as CL -- some list-like functions
import qualified Data.Conduit.Binary as CB -- bytes
import qualified Data.Conduit.Text as CT

data MyData = MyData Int Int
    deriving (Show)

binaryToData :: C.ByteString -> Maybe MyData
binaryToData bn = do
    let parts = C.split '-' bn
    case parts of
        (a:b:[]) -> MyData <$> (fst <$> (C.readInt a)) <*> (fst <$> (C.readInt b))
        _ -> Nothing

streamGenerator =
    CB.sourceFile "sample.txt" =$=
    CB.lines =$=
    CL.map binaryToData =$=
    CL.filter isJust =$=
    CL.map fromJust =$=
    CL.groupBy (\(MyData _ x) (MyData _ y) -> (x `quot` 4) == (y `quot` 4))

main :: IO ()
main = do
    mlines <- runResourceT $ streamGenerator $$ CL.consume
    print mlines

However I need multiple bar information off the stream at the same time. For example, for every 2 second bar I need a 4 second bar. If the 2 second bar being called is in the middle of the 4 second bar I want to output the previous 4 second bar.

Here is what I mean:

Standard Bars (numbers mean what ticks in terms of seconds past midnight the bar should contain):

2 second bar : 0-1, 2-3, 4-5, etc...
4 second bar : 0-3, 4-7, 8-11, etc...
combo: (0-1, null), (2-3, 0-3), (4-5, 0-3),  (6-7, 4-7), etc... 

So instead of my current conduit of groupings of 2 and 4 second bars:

4 second bar : [[MyData 3 150,MyData 2 151],[MyData 4 152,MyData 5 154,MyData 7 154,MyData 1 155,MyData 9 155],[MyData 6 156]]
2 second bar : [[MyData 3 150,MyData 2 151],[MyData 4 152],[MyData 5 154,MyData 7 154,MyData 1 155,MyData 9 155],[MyData 6 156]]

I would like this conduit stream:

[([MyData 3 150,MyData 2 151], [MyData 3 150,MyData 2 151])
,([MyData 4 152], [MyData 3 150,MyData 2 151])
,([MyData 5 154,MyData 7 154,MyData 1 155,MyData 9 155], [MyData 4 152,MyData 5 154,MyData 7 154,MyData 1 155,MyData 9 155])
,([MyData 6 156],[MyData 4 152,MyData 5 154,MyData 7 154,MyData 1 155,MyData 9 155])]

But I can't seem to quite do it without doing some ugly stuff.

share|improve this question
    
I'd look at Data.Conduit.List.concatMapAccum instead of groupBy, and yield a Map with each resolution you need... though I personally avoid doing much in the way of strategy development directly in a conduit, instead I like to use conduits to flow data in and out a strategy and rely on more specialized stream processors to handle the bulk of the computation, including bar generation if requested. –  Nathan Howell Dec 22 '12 at 7:57

1 Answer 1

I can answer your question using my pipes library, if you don't mind, since that's what I'm comfortable with. You can translate this solution to conduit if you prefer.

The clean solution to this required pushback, but pipes does not yet have push back, so I went ahead and implemented it (and I will include as an extension library in the near future):

import Control.Monad
import Control.Proxy
import Control.Proxy.Trans.State

-- Pushback primitives, soon to be in a `pipes` library

require :: (Monad m, Proxy p) => a' -> StateP [a] p a' a b' b m a
require a' = StateP $ \s -> runIdentityP $ do
    case s of
        [] -> do
            a <- request a'
            return (a, s)
        a:as -> do
            return (a, as)

pushback :: (Monad m, Proxy p) => a -> StateP [a] p a' a b' b m ()
pushback a = StateP $ \as -> runIdentityP $ return ((), a:as)

evalPushback = evalStateK []

With those in hand, the solution is straightforward:

data MyData = MyData Int Int deriving (Eq, Show)

-- Consumes ticks up until the deadline or the end of input
-- Returns the list of all ticks before the deadline
ticksUntil
 :: (Monad m, Proxy p)
 => Int -> () -> Consumer (StateP [Maybe MyData] p) (Maybe MyData) m [MyData]
ticksUntil deadline () = go where
    go = do
        x <- require ()
        case x of
            Just m@(MyData _ time) ->
                if (time < deadline)
                then do
                    ms <- go
                    return (m:ms)
                else do
                    pushback x
                    return []
            Nothing -> return []

bars
 :: (Monad m, Proxy p)
 => () -> Pipe (StateP [Maybe MyData] p) (Maybe MyData) ([MyData], [MyData]) m r
bars () = loop1 2 [] where
    -- First half of a 4-second window
    loop1 deadline b4 = do
        b2 <- (ticksUntil deadline >-> unitU) ()
        respond (b2, b4)
        loop2 (deadline + 2) b2 b4

    -- Second half of a 4-second window
    loop2 deadline b2 b4 = do
        b2' <- (ticksUntil deadline >-> unitU) ()
        let b4' = b2 ++ b2'
        respond (b2', b4')
        loop1 (deadline + 2) b4'

sample :: [MyData]
sample = [
    MyData 3 150,
    MyData 2 151,
    MyData 4 152,
    MyData 5 154,
    MyData 7 154,
    MyData 1 155,
    MyData 9 155,
    MyData 6 156]

-- Use the same trick as conduit: Nothing signals termination
source :: (Monad m, Proxy p) => () -> Producer p (Maybe MyData) m ()
source () = runIdentityP $ do
    (fromListS sample >-> mapD Just) ()
    respond Nothing

main = runProxy $
     source                 -- feed sample data
 >-> evalPushback bars      -- group the data into bars
 >-> filterD (/= ([], []))  -- Ignore empty bars
 >-> printD                 -- print outgoing bars

The magic is in the bars function. It just switches between two states. loop1 is the first state where it is expecting the first bar of 2 values out of a set of 4, and the loop2 is the second state where it is expecting the second bar of 2 values.

The hardest part of implementing this wasn't writing the code, but understanding your specification. Fortunately, though, I think I figured out what you meant, because my code produces the exact same behavior as your test examples:

>>> main
([MyData 3 150,MyData 2 151],[MyData 3 150,MyData 2 151])
([MyData 4 152],[MyData 3 150,MyData 2 151])
([MyData 5 154,MyData 7 154,MyData 1 155,MyData 9 155],[MyData 4 152,MyData 5 154,MyData 7 154,MyData 1 155,MyData 9 155])
([MyData 6 156],[MyData 4 152,MyData 5 154,MyData 7 154,MyData 1 155,MyData 9 155])

If this interests you in pipes, then I recommend you check out the pipes library, particularly the tutorial at Control.Proxy.Tutorial, which explains a lot of the idioms I use in the code.

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