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Writing a WinRT app in XAML/C# where I'd like a simple grid of square shaped buttons. The number of buttons is fixed currently, however in future there will be more added as I create more content.

Having to handle all UI resizes (snapped, filled, portrait, etc) and resolutions I ran into problems with the UIContainer (I was using a Grid then switched the WrapGrid) simply resizing the buttons automatically because I do not know of any way to constrain the aspect ratio and having square buttons is important to my UI.

Is there a way to constrain the aspect ratio / proportions of the Width and Height of a button control? If so, I'm assuming it would be to create a custom control, but other than creating styles and data templates I'm really just out of my depth.

Any suggestions on the best way to attack this problem?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can create a simple decorator control that would override ArrangeOverride and always arrange itself into a square, like this:

public class SquareDecorator : ContentControl
{
    public SquareDecorator()
    {
        VerticalAlignment = VerticalAlignment.Stretch;
        HorizontalAlignment = HorizontalAlignment.Stretch;
        VerticalContentAlignment = VerticalAlignment.Stretch;
        HorizontalContentAlignment = HorizontalAlignment.Stretch;
    }

    protected override Size MeasureOverride(Size availableSize)
    {
        var baseSize = base.MeasureOverride(availableSize);

        double sideLength = Math.Max(baseSize.Width, baseSize.Height);

        return new Size(sideLength, sideLength);
    }

    protected override Size ArrangeOverride(Size finalSize)
    {
        double sideLength = Math.Min(finalSize.Width, finalSize.Height);

        var result = base.ArrangeOverride(new Size(sideLength, sideLength));

        return result;
    }
}

Now you can wrap your buttons with this decorator:

<z:SquareDecorator>
    <Button Content="I'm Square"
            VerticalAlignment="Stretch"
            HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" />
</z:SquareDecorator>
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Good idea. However, I'm not sure deriving from ContentControl is very efficient. It requires a control template, fills the visual tree with other objects, and supports too much extra functionality like templates, etc. It is better to derive either from Panel or FrameworkElement. –  Aleksandr Dubinsky Dec 22 '12 at 11:10
    
As you mentioned in your answer, deriving from FrameworkElement is not an option. Deriving from Panel is not a very elegant solution either, because the interface of a Panel assumes that you can have multiple children, while ContentControl has only one children and thus is more suitable as a decorator. –  Pavlo Glazkov Dec 22 '12 at 22:29
    
In MeasureOverride, you have to take the Max of the width and height. Eg, if a button has some text that is width 40, and a natural height of 15, a square button should be sized 40x40. –  Aleksandr Dubinsky Dec 26 '12 at 11:22
    
Yes, you are right. Updated my answer. –  Pavlo Glazkov Dec 26 '12 at 11:24

I'm assuming you can't just set height and width to a fixed size (on the button itself or in a style for the button).

I tried doing this in Silverlight:

<Button Height={Binding ActualWidth, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}/>

But it doesn't want to work. Don't know why. It might work in WinRT.

Alternatively, you can create a custom Panel to arrange and size your buttons. Should not be difficult given your simple requirements. It involves implementing just two functions and knowledge of basic arithmetic. Here is an example that creates a UniformGrid.

I don't think a UserControl or deriving from Button would be better choices.

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Yeah I saw this solution at XAML Wonderland - link. But it doesn't work in WinRT in either a style or directly in the button element. I have no idea why either. If I could get this working this would be my preferable choice as it is the simplest. –  Styff Dec 22 '12 at 8:50
    
You can try writing an attached behavior that listens to SizeChanged on the button and sets Height to equal ActualWidth. But I must say I really like Pavlo's solution best. It is both simple and efficient. A binding or an attached behavior will need two layout passes to arrive at the final size. –  Aleksandr Dubinsky Dec 22 '12 at 11:00

Here's my version of Pavlo's answer. It is more efficient and elegant than deriving from ContentControl (which must use a ControlTemplate, adds other elements to the visual tree, and has tons of other unneeded functionality). I also believe it is more correct, because MeasureOverride returns the correct desired size.

public class SquareDecorator : Panel
{
    protected override Size MeasureOverride(Size availableSize)
    {
        if( Children.Count == 0 )   return base.MeasureOverride(availableSize);
        if( Children.Count > 1 )    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("SquareDecorator should have one child");

        Children[0].Measure(availableSize);
        var sideLength = Math.Max(Children[0].DesiredSize.Width, Children[0].DesiredSize.Height);
        return new Size(sideLength, sideLength);
    }

    protected override Size ArrangeOverride(Size finalSize)
    {
        if( Children.Count == 0 )   return base.ArrangeOverride(finalSize);
        if( Children.Count > 1 )    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("SquareDecorator should have one child");

        double sideLength = Math.Min(finalSize.Width, finalSize.Height);
        Children[0].Arrange(new Rect(0, 0, sideLength, sideLength));
        return new Size(sideLength, sideLength);
    }
}

Use it the same way (Button's Horizontal/VerticalAlignment must be stretch, but this is the default. Also note you can get useful effects if you set SquareDecorator's Horizontal/VerticalAlignment to non-stretch.):

<z:SquareDecorator>
   <Button Content="I'm Square"/>
</z:SquareDecorator>

I would have derived from FrameworkElement, but it looks like neither Silverlight nor WinRT allow you to do that. (FrameworkElement is not sealed, but has no AddVisualChild method which makes it useless to derive from. Sigh, I hate .NET and/or Microsoft)

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Good point about MeasureOverride, added to my answer. As for "unneeded functionality", I don't think it is a big problem in this case. Deriving from Panel is not very elegant solution either, because by throwing an exception when Children collection contains more than one element you violate the Liskov substitution principle. Interface of a Panel assumes that you can have multiple children, while ContentControl has only one children and thus is more suitable as a decorator. –  Pavlo Glazkov Dec 22 '12 at 22:24

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