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Say I have a class declared as follows:

public class ExampleClass 
{
   public Action<int> Do { get; set; }

   public ExampleClass()
   {
   }

   public void FuncA(int n)
   {
       //irrelevant code here
   }

   public void FuncB(int n)
   {
       //other irrelevant code here
   }
}

I want to be able to use this class like this

ExampleClass excl = new ExampleClass() { Do = FuncA }

or

ExampleClass excl = new ExampleClass() { Do = excl.FuncA }

or

ExampleClass excl = new ExampleClass() { Do = ExampleClass.FuncA }

I can compile the second option there, but I get a "Delegate to an instance method cannot have null 'this'." exception when I hit that code. The third one doesn't even make sense, because FuncA isn't static.

In my actual code, there will be maybe 10-15 different functions it could get tied to, and I could be adding or removing them at any time, so I don't want to have to have a large switch or it-else statement. Additionally, being able assign a value to 'Do' when instantiating the class is very convenient.

Am I just using incorrect syntax? Is there a better way to create a class and assign an action in one line? Should I just man up and manage a huge switch statement?

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2 Answers 2

You have to create the instance of the class and later set the property to the instance member. Something like:

ExampleClass excl = new ExampleClass();
excl.Do = excl.FuncA;

For your line:

ExampleClass excl = new ExampleClass() { Do = FuncA }

FuncA is not visible without an instance of the class.

For:

ExampleClass excl = new ExampleClass() { Do = excl.FuncA }

Instance has not yet been created that is why you are getting the exception for null reference.

For:

ExampleClass excl = new ExampleClass() { Do = ExampleClass.FuncA }

FuncA is not a static method, you can't access it with the class name.

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So there's no good way to use the object initializer to set up the Actions? If I have five Actions I need to set up, does each use of my class have to require five extra statements to initialize? –  user1920703 Dec 21 '12 at 6:11
    
@user1920703 are they really that extra? Almost the same as using object initializer syntax. –  horgh Dec 21 '12 at 6:13
    
@user1920703, its not just about Action, you can't set properties referring to the same instance properties. The only thing to keep in mind is that the instance you are trying to use in the object initializer has not yet been created. You may pass some parameter in the constructor and based on that set your property Do. –  Habib Dec 21 '12 at 6:15

In object initializer syntax you cannot access the variable being initialized before it is definitely assigned:

ExampleClass excl = new ExampleClass() 
{ 
    Do = excl.FuncA //excl is unavailable here
}

Read Object and Collection Initializers (C# Programming Guide) for more info.


You could do the following, for example:

public class ExampleClass
{
    public Action<int> Do { get; set; }

    public ExampleClass(bool useA)
    {
        if (useA)
            Do = FuncA;
        else
            Do = FuncB;
    }

    public void FuncA(int n)
    {
        //irrelevant code here
    }

    public void FuncB(int n)
    {
        //other irrelevant code here
    }

}

and use it:

 ExampleClass exclA = new ExampleClass(true);
 ExampleClass exclB = new ExampleClass(false);

Another idea is if these functions may be declared as static (i.e. they don't need any instance members of the ExampleClass), then this would work:

public class ExampleClass
{
    public Action<int> Do { get; set; }

    public ExampleClass() { }

    public static void FuncA(int n) { /*...*/}

    public static void FuncB(int n) { /*...*/}
}

and use it the way you want:

ExampleClass excl = new ExampleClass() { Do = ExampleClass.FuncA };
share|improve this answer
    
If I have lots of functions in ExampleClass, this solutions becomes very problematic very quickly. I would have to make changes in two places every time I added or removed functions, and would need to keep track of all parameter-to-function relationships somewhere. –  user1920703 Dec 21 '12 at 6:16
    
@user1920703 well, you could have a enum enumerating all kinds of functions and pass it as a parameter; bool was only an example. In fact, the answer to the original question remains the same - you cannot use object initializer syntax that way, as the variable being initialized is not created by that time. –  horgh Dec 21 '12 at 6:19
1  
Your first sentence, though typically true, is actually incorrect. It is perfectly legal to access a variable in its own initialization. For example, suppose you have a method int M(out int x). Then it is perfectly legal to say something crazy like int i = M(out i) + i; In order to be correct, your first statement should be emended to say "In the object initializer syntax it is illegal to access the variable before it is definitely assigned." –  Eric Lippert Dec 21 '12 at 6:29
    
@user1920703 think of making the functions static. Read my edited answer for more details –  horgh Dec 21 '12 at 6:32
    
@EricLippert thank you so much for the clarification...I'll try to think more deeply next time. I'll edit that very statement with your kindly permission –  horgh Dec 21 '12 at 6:34

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