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I want to serialize objects in c++. At first I tried a simple solution, I overloaded the << and >> operators of the class to serialize; This way I can select witch attribute to serialize into a strinstream and I can then deserialize the same stringstream into the attribute of another object of the same type later on. That worked until I realized that if the class to serialize contains pointers to other classes then I would need to overload their >> and << operators as well.

So I started thinking that what if I get the object to serialize and traverse it char (1 byte) by char and then save the result into a string. Then later on take that string and reinterpret_cast it into the original class. This way I would be able to serialize any class containing any type of information without caring about what it contains and without overloading any operator.

I implemented this second method and it seams to be Ok but is it?

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <stdlib.h>
using namespace std;

class B
{
public:
      B(int one , int two)
      { 
            this->one = one; 
            this->two = two;
      }
      int one;
      int two;      
};

class A
{
public:
      A(int one , int two, B b)
      {
            this->one = one; 
            this->two = two;
            classB= new B(b);
      }
      int one;
      int two;   
      B* classB;   
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    B b(3,4);
    A* a = new A(1,2, b);


    //Serializing 'a'
    char v[sizeof(A)];
    for (int i =0 ;i<sizeof(A);i++)
    {
        v[i] = (reinterpret_cast<char*>(a)[i]);
    }

    char* cp = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * sizeof(A));
    for (int i =0 ;i<sizeof(A);i++)
    { 
        cp[i] = v[i];                          
    }

    A* aa = reinterpret_cast<A*>(cp);

    cout << aa->one << endl;
    cout << aa->two<< endl;
    cout << aa->classB->one<< endl;

    free(cp);
    system("PAUSE");
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;

// OUTPUT is as expect:
   1 
   2 
   3
}

So what do you think? do you foresee any complications regarding the second method? Please bare in mind that I am very new to C++ and I am trying to develop working theories.

share|improve this question
    
Have you considered Boost.Serialization? –  K-ballo Dec 21 '12 at 6:15
    
Boost serialization requires building the lib and generating binaries, I can only use header only libraries. Also, I would like to learn how to do this :) –  Kam Dec 21 '12 at 6:16
    
This (second) method won't work with things that store pointers. –  Cornstalks Dec 21 '12 at 6:16
    
@Cornstalks, why? –  Kam Dec 21 '12 at 6:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This second method you mention (basically just writing and reading the raw bytes for a data structure) won't work for things that store pointers. Why? Look at it this way:

struct S
{
    int* i;
};
S s;

Let's say you write the raw bytes of s by doing something like: file.write((char*)&s, sizeof(s)). This will write the raw value of the pointer i, but it won't write the value stored in i (i.e. the value returned by *i). If you try to reload the data structure, i will be pointing to a potentially invalid area of memory (because it's the address that was stored in i that you saved/loaded, not the contents at the address).

share|improve this answer
    
mm I get it, But I did implement the second method, please take a look at it ( I updated my answer). It seams to work :$ but you are correct it shouldn't. –  Kam Dec 21 '12 at 6:36
    
Sorry I got it :) you are correct, the reason my code works is because it just so happen that object 'a' is still valid in memory and the pointer classB still points to real data on the heap. if this memory location is flushed out somehow (reboot for example) I can reuse the serialized data to recover object 'a'. –  Kam Dec 21 '12 at 6:43

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