Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to sort structures stored on a vector using the sort C++ function. I have done this before without any problems. However I'm not obtaining the desired output.

If I try the compare function by itself it works, but once I use the sort C++ function the compare function doesn't seem to be working.

The idea is to sort int arrays as if they were binary numbers in ascending order. I know there are different ways of doing this, but I don't understand why this doesn't work.

The expected output is:

0000000000
0101010101
0110110110

The output is:

0000000000
0110110110
0101010101

I don't understand what happen here. Here is my code:

using namespace std;
int n;
struct solucion{
  int array[150];
};

vector <solucion> soluciones;

bool compare(solucion solucion1, solucion solucion2){
  for(int i=1;i<=n;i++)
    if(solucion2.array[i]>solucion1.array[i])
      return true;
  return false;
}

void print() {
  for(int i=0;i<soluciones.size();i++){
    for(int k=1;k<=n;k++)
      cout << soluciones.at(i).array[k];
    cout << endl;
  }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    solucion solucion1;
    solucion1.array[1]=0;
    solucion1.array[2]=0;
    solucion1.array[3]=0;
    solucion1.array[4]=0;
    solucion1.array[5]=0;
    solucion1.array[6]=0;
    solucion1.array[7]=0;
    solucion1.array[8]=0;
    solucion1.array[9]=0;
    solucion1.array[10]=0;

    solucion solucion2;
    solucion2.array[1]=0;
    solucion2.array[2]=1;
    solucion2.array[3]=0;
    solucion2.array[4]=1;
    solucion2.array[5]=0;
    solucion2.array[6]=1;
    solucion2.array[7]=0;
    solucion2.array[8]=1;
    solucion2.array[9]=0;
    solucion2.array[10]=1;

    solucion solucion3;
    solucion3.array[1]=0;
    solucion3.array[2]=1;
    solucion3.array[3]=1;
    solucion3.array[4]=0;
    solucion3.array[5]=1;
    solucion3.array[6]=1;
    solucion3.array[7]=0;
    solucion3.array[8]=1;
    solucion3.array[9]=1;
    solucion3.array[10]=0;

    soluciones.push_back(solucion1);
    soluciones.push_back(solucion2);
    soluciones.push_back(solucion3);

    n=10;
    sort(soluciones.begin(),soluciones.end(),compare);
    print();
    system("PAUSE");
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by jogojapan, WhozCraig, Max MacLeod, H2CO3, Graviton Dec 26 '12 at 1:46

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Arrays start at index 0 in C based languages. –  K-ballo Dec 21 '12 at 6:14
    
@K-ballo But he's ignoring index 0 in both his compare and print functions, so that's irrelevant. –  Barmar Dec 21 '12 at 6:16
    
Yes..but the compare function, the print function and everything begin at index 1, so there is really no problem with that –  fragal Dec 21 '12 at 6:17

3 Answers 3

Your comparison function does not properly establish a strict weak ordering over the arrays (for example, if solucion1 = {1,0,1} and solucion2 = {0,1,0} then according to your compare function, both solucion1 < solucion2 and solucion2 < solucion1 will be true, which is clearly absurd).

You should change the definition comparison to something which does provide such an ordering, such as std::lexicographical_compare.

bool compare(solucion solucion1, solucion solucion2){
    return std::lexicographical_compare(
        solucion1.array+1, solucion1.array+1+n,
        solucion2.array+1, solucion2.array+1+n);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Using my comparison function solucion2>solucion1 since the element with index 1 is checked first and 1>0 –  fragal Dec 21 '12 at 6:27
1  
@fragal: Yes, but if the comparison is done in the other order, index 1 is checked first, nothing happens, and then index 2 is checked and the comparison also returns true. –  Mankarse Dec 21 '12 at 6:35

You need to return false as soon as you see that right struct is less:

bool compare(solucion solucion1, solucion solucion2){
  for(int i=1;i<=n;i++) {
    if(solucion2.array[i] > solucion1.array[i])
      return true; 
    else if (solucion2.array[i] < solucion1.array[i])
      return false; 
  }
  return false;  
}    

And a better way to initialize:

solucion solucion1 = {{0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0}};
solucion solucion2 = {{0,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1}};
solucion solucion3 = {{0,0,1,1,0,1,1,0,1,1,0}};
share|improve this answer
    
Your compare function fixes the problem (and i noticed that i was missing to return false as soon as the right struct is less)....but I don't get why my original compare function didn't worked for this SPECIFIC case. If i use my compare function to test individually solucion2 and solucion3 it returns that solucion3>solucion2, however when passed as a parameter to the sort function it doesn't seem to be doing the same –  fragal Dec 21 '12 at 6:35
    
because when system calls the function solution3 and soultion2 can change positions, meaning they can be at the right or left side. Your function cannot generate correct result when smaller one is on the right. –  perreal Dec 21 '12 at 6:41
    
for example for 101 and 110 you return true, however it should be false –  perreal Dec 21 '12 at 6:42
    
@fragal: The simple answer is that std::sort requires a comparitor that establishes a strict weak order, and so your code has undefined behaviour. The implementation of std::sort does not necessarily pass solucion3 as the first argument to the comparitor and solucion2 as the second every time. –  Mankarse Dec 21 '12 at 6:43
    
OK, I wasn't seeing that solution3 and solution2 could change positions. Thank you so much!!!!!! –  fragal Dec 21 '12 at 6:45

your solutions crashes for me , try

 bool compare(solucion solucion1, solucion solucion2){
       for(int i=1;i<=n;i++)
       {
          if(solucion2.array[i]>solucion1.array[i])
               return true; 
          else
            return false;  
       }

   }    
share|improve this answer
    
Testing individually 0101010101 and 0110110110 0101010101 < 0110110110 since the second number from left to right is greater for the second array (while the first number was equal). So although my compare function was not right at all, it should have worked for this case –  fragal Dec 21 '12 at 6:37
    
For instance: if(compare(solucion2,solucion3)) cout<<"AT LEAST MY COMPARE FUNCTION SHOULD WORK FOR THIS CASE"<<endl; prints the given output –  fragal Dec 21 '12 at 6:43

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.