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Right now I'm using the following code to get Euler values from the device's gyroscope. Is this how it's supposed to be used? Or is there a better way without using NSTimer?

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    CMMotionManager *motionManger = [[CMMotionManager alloc] init];
    [motionManger startDeviceMotionUpdates];

    NSTimer *timer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:(1/6) target:self selector:@selector(read) userInfo:nil repeats:YES];
}
- (void)read {
    CMAttitude *attitude;
    CMDeviceMotion *motion = motionManger.deviceMotion;
    attitude = motion.attitude;
    int yaw = attitude.yaw; 
}
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Looks Good To ME :) –  Programmer... Dec 21 '12 at 6:32
    
My goal is to continuously monitor the yaw value to determine if the device has rotated 360 degrees along its center. What's the most efficient way to do this? –  thisiscrazy4 Dec 21 '12 at 6:43

2 Answers 2

You Can Use This...

    [motionManager startDeviceMotionUpdatesToQueue:[NSOperationQueue currentQueue] withHandler:^(CMDeviceMotion *motion, NSError *error)
 {
     CMAttitude *attitude;
     attitude = motion.attitude;
     int yaw = attitude.yaw; 
 }];
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Directly to quote the documentation:

Handling Motion Updates at Specified Intervals

To receive motion data at specific intervals, the app calls a “start” method that takes an operation queue (instance of NSOperationQueue) and a block handler of a specific type for processing those updates. The motion data is passed into the block handler. The frequency of updates is determined by the value of an “interval” property.

[...]

Device motion. Set the deviceMotionUpdateInterval property to specify an update interval. Call the or startDeviceMotionUpdatesUsingReferenceFrame:toQueue:withHandler: or startDeviceMotionUpdatesToQueue:withHandler: method, passing in a block of type CMDeviceMotionHandler. With the former method (new in iOS 5.0), you can specify a reference frame to be used for the attitude estimates. Rotation-rate data is passed into the block as CMDeviceMotion objects.

So e.g.

motionManger.deviceMotionUpdateInterval = 1.0/6.0; // not 1/6; 1/6 = 0
[motionManager 
    startDeviceMotionUpdatesToQueue:[NSOperationQueue mainQueue]
    withHandler:
        ^(CMDeviceMotion *motion, NSError *error)
         {
             CMAttitude *attitude;
             attitude = motion.attitude;
             int yaw = attitude.yaw; 
         }];

I've lazily just used the main queue but that still may be a better solution than the NSTimer because it'll give the motion manager an explicit clue about how often you care to be updated.

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