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It's ok to get and print the outer function variable a

def outer():
    a = 1
    def inner():
        print a

It's also ok to get the outer function array a and append something

def outer():
    a = []
    def inner():
        a.append(1)
        print a

However, it caused some trouble when I tried to increase the integer:

def outer():
    a = 1
    def inner():
        a += 1 #or a = a + 1
        print a

>> UnboundLocalError: local variable 'a' referenced before assignment

Why does this happen and how can I achieve my goal (increase the integer)?

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Of course, you could also pass a to inner from outer. –  sberry Dec 21 '12 at 7:04
2  
@sberry: That will not allow what he's trying to do, since it will create a new local variable inside inner, changes to which will not be reflected in outer. –  BrenBarn Dec 21 '12 at 7:04
    
Right, unless it is returned, or the OP only has use of a within inner anyway. –  sberry Dec 21 '12 at 7:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Workaround for Python 2:

def outer():
    a = [1]
    def inner():
        a[0] += 1
        print a[0]
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Oh! It works!! Thank you! –  waitingkuo Dec 21 '12 at 16:30

In Python 3 you can do this with the nonlocal keyword. Do nonlocal a at the beginning of inner to mark a as nonlocal.

In Python 2 it is not possible.

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I'm afraid that I'm using python 2.7.... Thanks for your advice. –  waitingkuo Dec 21 '12 at 7:02

A generally cleaner way to do this would be:

def outer():
    a = 1
    def inner(b):
        b += 1
        return b
    a = inner(a)

Python allows a lot, but non-local variables can be generally considered as "dirty" (without going into details here).

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Ya, I'm using this way currently, thanks. –  waitingkuo Dec 21 '12 at 7:05

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