Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Method return should be like if entered a number, suppose 345, then output should be 3+4+5=12 --> 1+2 = 3. what i am doing wrong here?

public class DigitSum
 {
    int  Sum=0;

    public int compute( int MethParam )
    {
        int rem = MethParam%10; 
        Sum+=rem;        

        MethParam = MethParam/10; 
        if(MethParam>10)
            compute(MethParam);

        return Sum+MethParam;  
    }

  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    DigitSum ds  = new DigitSum();
    System.out.println(ds.compute(435));
  }
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Brian Roach, Konstantin D - Infragistics, EdChum, RaYell, Seki Dec 21 '12 at 11:47

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
So what's the issue? Are you getting wrong output? –  Rohit Jain Dec 21 '12 at 7:09
    
try debugging with the debugger or some print statements. –  jlordo Dec 21 '12 at 7:11
    
Why are you using recursion? –  Mark Byers Dec 21 '12 at 7:11
    
reducing complexity may be.. imo its better than using for loop for big numbers, as some pal used below. –  Manish Singh Dec 21 '12 at 7:52
    
please see my answer for shortest code tip.. –  Meraman Dec 21 '12 at 8:08

13 Answers 13

up vote 15 down vote accepted

O(1) Algo for sum Of digits :

Taking the modulo 9 of any number will return the sum of digits of that number until a single digit number is obtained.

If the number is a multiple of 9, then the sum will will be 9

one liner :

public int sumDigit(int n){
    return (n%9 == 0 && n != 0) ? 9 : n%9;
}

Alternate implementation :

public int sumDigit(int n){

      int sum = n % 9;
      if(sum == 0){
          if(n > 0)
               return 9;
      }
      return sum;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you please specify the error as the code is working absolutely fine on my machine. –  rahulroc Dec 21 '12 at 7:39
1  
Thanks for the trick..dint know that –  Manish Singh Dec 21 '12 at 7:44
2  
This is an awesome solution –  GeekRide Dec 21 '12 at 7:47
    
@rahulroc.. Sorry bro. It's fine. So I deleted my comment. –  Rohit Jain Dec 21 '12 at 7:48
    
@RohitJain .. np Dude –  rahulroc Dec 21 '12 at 7:53

What you are looking for is digital root. So here's a better solution using the formula from wiki page I linked.

Without Recursion: -

public static int compute( int n ) {
    return n - 9 * ((n - 1) / 9);
}

And, just in case you want (Which I don't think you would), here's a one-liner (Using Recursion): -

public static int compute( int n ) {
    return n < 10 ? n : compute(n % 10 + compute(n / 10));
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 it won't get better than that. –  jlordo Dec 21 '12 at 7:47
    
dood one word..that is Dope :) –  Manish Singh Dec 21 '12 at 8:00
    
can't get better solution than this, without recursion. –  Meraman Dec 21 '12 at 9:02
    public int FindSumDigit(int number)
    {
        if (number < 10) return number;
        int sum = 0;
        while (number > 0)
        {
            sum += number % 10;
            number = number / 10;
        }
        return FindSumDigit(sum);
    }

Find my code... Poon you were not adding the whole digits.. In middle itself u was keep on adding the right most digit.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Elegant solution. Like it better than mine, and unlike most of the answers here returns the desired result. –  jlordo Dec 21 '12 at 7:34
    
please see my answer for shortest code tip.. –  Meraman Dec 21 '12 at 8:09
    
Neater recursive version of this: public static int sum(int n) { if(n < 10) return n; return sum(n / 10) + n%10; } –  cowls Feb 18 '13 at 12:14

Many wrong answers here. Here's what OP wants:

Method return should be like if entered a number, suppose 345, then output should be 3+4+5=12 --> 1+2 = 3.

This will do the job:

public static int compute(int param) {
    int sum = 0;
    do {
        sum = 0;
        while (param > 0) {
            sum += param % 10;
            param /= 10;
        }
        param = sum;
    } while (sum >= 10);
    return sum;
}
share|improve this answer

I changed your method to this, then it gives the requested result:

public int compute(int methParam) {
    int sum = 0;
    for (int i = 0; methParam > 10; i++) {
        int currentDigit = methParam % 10;
        methParam = methParam / 10;
        sum = sum + currentDigit;
    }
    if (sum + methParam > 10) {
        return compute(sum + methParam);
    } else {
        return sum + methParam;
    }
}

Please note that i moved the declaration of sum inside the method, instead of making it a field.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah!! You are increasing too much load. Why that need of logarithmic computation? Just iterate till the number is greater than 0. –  Rohit Jain Dec 21 '12 at 7:21
1  
This answer also returns 12 for input 345, OP wants output to be 3 –  jlordo Dec 21 '12 at 7:21
    
I edited the method to output 3 and removed the logarithmic, it was indeed overkill. –  Frank Dec 21 '12 at 7:28

IN your code your are not properly returning values to get call for your recursion method.

        if ((MethParam >= 10)){
            return compute(MethParam);
        }else
            return Sum + MethParam;
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but i think it still not fulfilling the O/P like 445 should give 4 instead of 13. –  Manish Singh Dec 21 '12 at 7:35
public int compute( int param )
{
    int x = param % 10;
    int y = param / 10;

    if (y > 0)
        return x + compute(y);

    return x;
}

public int computeNonRec(int param) {
    int result = 0;
    while (param > 0) {
        result += param % 10;
        param /= 10;
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

Try

 public int sumDigit(int n) {
        int sum = 0;
        while (n > 0) {
            sum += n % 10;
            number = n / 10;
        }
        return sum;
    }
share|improve this answer

just a different approach, may not be as efficient due to involved conversions:

private static int getUltimateSum(int input) {
    String inputStr = String.valueOf(input);
    int sum = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < inputStr.length(); i++) {
        int digit = Integer.valueOf(String.valueOf(inputStr.charAt(i)));
        sum += digit;
    }
    if(sum > 9)
        return getUltimateSum(sum);
    else
        return sum;
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a string solution:

public int compute( int MethParam )
{
    int sum = 0; 
    string meth = MethParam.ToString();        

    for (char x in meth) {
        sum += int.Parse(x);
    }
    if (sum >= 10) {
        return compute(sum);
    }
    else {
        return sum;
    }
}

This code is in C# not Java so consider it pseudocode.

share|improve this answer
1  
You should mention that it's not Java. Also it doesn't return desired result. –  jlordo Dec 21 '12 at 7:39
    
@jlordo I forgot the recursive call. Now it should return as expected. –  Konstantin D - Infragistics Dec 21 '12 at 7:42
    
Now it'll return the correct result, but your answer should mention the programming language if it's not the one the OP uses. –  jlordo Dec 21 '12 at 7:45
    
Oh excuse me this is C# –  Konstantin D - Infragistics Dec 21 '12 at 8:06

try

public class DigitSum {
int  Sum=0;
public int compute( int MethParam )
{
    int rem = MethParam%10; 
    Sum+=rem;        

    MethParam = MethParam/10; 
    if(MethParam>10)
        compute(MethParam);
    else
        Sum+=MethParam;

        if(Sum>=10){
        int temp=Sum;
        Sum=0;
        compute(temp);
    }

         return Sum;  
}

public static void main(String[] args){
    DigitSum ds= new DigitSum();
        System.out.println(ds.compute(435));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
have you tried before posting? for input 345 OP wants 3, you return 12. –  jlordo Dec 21 '12 at 7:48

shortest code for this is -

int compute(int n){
    while(n > 9){
        n = n - 9;
    }
    return n;
}

where n is number for which you want to compute some of its digits.

EDIT: Efficient for only small numbers, say 3 digit number.

EDIT: Tested few answers:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String [] args){
        int i = 0x0fefefef;

        long st1 = System.nanoTime();
        int n1 = sumDigit(i);
        long t1 = System.nanoTime() - st1;

        long st2 = System.nanoTime();
        int n2 = FindSumDigit(i);
        long t2 = System.nanoTime() - st2;

        long st3 = System.nanoTime();
        int n3 = compute(i);
        long t3 = System.nanoTime() - st3;

        long st4 = System.nanoTime();
        int n4 = compute1(i);
        long t4 = System.nanoTime() - st4;

        System.out.println("Tested for: "+i);
        System.out.println(n1+": "+t1);
        System.out.println(n2+": "+t2);
        System.out.println(n3+": "+t3);
        System.out.println(n4+": "+t4);
    }

    public static int sumDigit(int n){
      int sum = n % 9;
      if(sum == 0){
          if(n > 0)
               return 9;
      }
      return sum;
    }

    public static int FindSumDigit(int n)
    {
        if (n < 10) return n;
        int sum = 0;
        while (n > 0)
        {
            sum += n % 10;
            n = n / 10;
        }
        return FindSumDigit(sum);
    }

    public static int compute( int n ) {
        return n - 9 * ((n - 1) / 9);
    }

    public static int compute1(int n){
        while(n > 9){
            n = n - 9;
        }
        return n;
    }
}

Here is result for above test:

Tested for: 267382767
3: 2432
3: 1621
3: 810
3: 5354519
share|improve this answer
    
This is shortest code just for writing. But it may take hell lot of iteration to complete. For e.g. try it for 9999999. It will take 1111110 iterations. –  Rohit Jain Dec 21 '12 at 8:17
    
True Rohit, this is just another solution with some mathematics logic. –  Meraman Dec 21 '12 at 8:22
    
Rohit, my solution is only efficient if number is less than say 2222, it is not generalized solution for number greater than 2222 in terms of CPU, but if you say number will be less than 999 for sure, my solution will be efficient, I am sure. Because if you go with solution provided by Gaurav, that solution will have overhead of method call stacks and hell lot of time on divisions and modulo operations. I have tested and found my solution efficient compared to Gaurav's solution for number less than 2222, or say only 3 digit number. –  Meraman Dec 21 '12 at 8:50
    
@user1508907.. Hmm. Yeah recursion will not give efficient performance for all input. But we cannot assume that we would get only a certain subset. So, for greater number, which of course we can get, you know what is the drawback of your method. Anyways, for more efficient solution even for greater number, see my answer. –  Rohit Jain Dec 21 '12 at 8:54
    
@RohitJain, +25 for best solution without recursion. Can't get any more efficient than that, :) –  Meraman Dec 21 '12 at 9:00

use this simple java code I created some tymz ago, this was for adding positive numbers as well as negative numbers:

class SumDigit
{
public static void main(String args[])
{
int sum, i,a,d;
a = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
sum = 0;
for(i=1;i< =10;i++)
{
d = a%10;
a = a/10;
sum=sum + d;
} 
System.out.println("Sum of Digit :"+sum);
}
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Please. At least bother to format your code. –  Rohit Jain Dec 21 '12 at 7:14
1  
:P thtz testers and debuggers work :P –  Azzy Dec 21 '12 at 7:15
    
it won't even compile. for(i=1;i< =10;i++) and won't produce output 3 for input 345, which is what OP is looking for. –  jlordo Dec 21 '12 at 7:16
1  
thnx for a vote down Rohit :P –  Azzy Dec 21 '12 at 7:20
2  
@Azzy.. Well, I very rarely vote down a post. That you can see from my profile. But your code won't compile. And neither will it give correct result when run. You are iterating 10 times. Why are you sure that you need 10 iterations here? I think down votes are justified here. You improve your answer I'll remove my downvote. –  Rohit Jain Dec 21 '12 at 7:22

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.