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public class A
    {
        private void sub()
        {
            add();
        }
        private void add()
        { 
              -----
        }
    }

I can call the add method in sub like above and I can do the same as below

public class A
{
    private void sub()
    {
        A obj_A = new A();
        obj_A.add();
    }
    private void add()
    { 
           -----
    }
}

I would like to know the differences between them. Thank you.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the first method you are calling the add method of the same instance of the class. In the second example you are creating a new instance of the class and calling its add method.

For example:

public class A
    {
        private int num = 3;

        private void sub()
        {
          num = 10;            
          add();
        }
        private void add()
        { 
              system.out.println(num);
        }
    }

public class A
{
    private int num = 3;

    private void sub()
    {
        A obj_A = new A();
        num = 10;      
        obj_A.add();
    }
    private void add()
    { 
           system.out.println(num);
    }
}

In the first example, it will print 10. In the second one, it will print 3. This os because in the first example you are printing num of the instance itself that you have previously modified. In the second example you also modify num value but since you are invoking add of the new class you have created it will print 3.

share|improve this answer
    
but in the second case if I assign num as 10 in the sub and then call add then num will be again 10. – Raghurocks Dec 21 '12 at 7:29
1  
@Raghurocks.. No num will not be 10 there. A different instance is running the add() method. And in sub() method, you are setting num = 10, for different instance. – Rohit Jain Dec 21 '12 at 7:31
1  
@Raghurocks.. Currently it is - this.num = 10; To change num for new object, you need - obj_A.num = 10;. – Rohit Jain Dec 21 '12 at 7:31
1  
@Raghurocks And what if num doesn't have public accessors? This should show roughly what is happening. You have two values of num, one on each instance of class A. In your second example you create a whole new instance of A. – Averroes Dec 21 '12 at 7:32
1  
@Raghurocks.. When you first time call sub() method from main, you are creating an instance of A, right. Now, in sub() method, you are again creating an instance of A(), to call add() method. Whereas in 1st case, you are invoking the add() method on the same reference this. this is a reference to the current instance executing. So, in first case, this refers to the same instance in both add() and sub() method. Whereas in 2nd case, this refers to different instances in both methods. – Rohit Jain Dec 21 '12 at 8:51
  • If you create an instance of A with the first class and invoke sub() you will have 1 instance of A within the method scope.
  • If you create an instance of A with the second class and invoke sub() you will have 2 instances of A wihin the method scope.
share|improve this answer
    
This could confuse, as obj_A only has local scope, and will be released when the method sub completes. – Xetius Dec 21 '12 at 9:04
    
@Xetius you are right. now the confusion is removed, i think. – Juvanis Dec 21 '12 at 9:08

Java classes have a special member defined called this which refers to the current object.

This answer will give you more details on this.

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By second method, to invoke add method two objects will be created, by using the method 1 we can access add method by just creating one object

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In second approch unneciserly we are creating Object.

First approch is better.

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private void sub()
{
  add();
}

Calling method add() on the same object which called sub() method.

private void sub()
{
   A obj_A = new A();
   obj_A.add();
}

Creating new object of type A and calling add() method on it.

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