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Best XML parser for Java
How i can convert this xml file into an XML object?

I have a XML like this . And i want to convert it into JAVA object.

<P1>
    <CTS>
        Hello
    </CTS>
    <CTS>
        World
    </CTS>
<P1>    

So I created following java classes with their properties.

P1 class

@XmlRootElement
public class P1 {
    @XmlElement(name = "CTS")
    List<CTS> cts;
}

CTS class

public class CTS {
    String ct;
}

Test Class

File file = new File("D:\\ContentTemp.xml");
            JAXBContext jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance(P1.class);

            Unmarshaller jaxbUnmarshaller = jaxbContext.createUnmarshaller();
            P1 p = (P1) jaxbUnmarshaller.unmarshal(file);

But I am getting following error -

com.sun.xml.internal.bind.v2.runtime.IllegalAnnotationsException: 
2 counts of IllegalAnnotationExceptions
Class has two properties of the same name "cts"
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Kazekage Gaara, Bobby, Isaac, dogbane, Andro Selva Dec 21 '12 at 11:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@everyone I have made my question simpler so that i can get the answer. –  Thinker Dec 21 '12 at 9:51
    
@Kazekage Gaara That is only my question. Made it simpler. –  Thinker Dec 21 '12 at 9:51
1  
@Thinker People are not here to give someone full answer but to help each other find an approach –  Festus Tamakloe Dec 21 '12 at 9:52
    
i have asked where am i wrong . I have given my test class. –  Thinker Dec 21 '12 at 9:52
    
You need to put package-info.java in your generated jaxb package. –  Festus Tamakloe Dec 21 '12 at 9:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

UPDATE

com.sun.xml.internal.bind.v2.runtime.IllegalAnnotationsException: 2 counts of IllegalAnnotationExceptions Class has two properties of the same name "cts"

By default a JAXB (JSR-222) implementation creates mappings based on properties and annotated fields. When you annotate a field for which there is also a property it will cause this error.

Option #1 - Use @XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)

You could annotate the field you need to specify @XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD) on the class.

@XmlRootElement(name="P1)
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class P1 {

    @XmlElement(name = "CTS")
    List<CTS> cts;

}

Option #2 - Annotate the Property (get method)

Alternatively you could annotate the get method.

@XmlRootElement(name="P1)
public class P1 {

    List<CTS> cts;

    @XmlElement(name = "CTS")
    public List<CTS> getCts() {
        return cts;
    }

}

For More Information


FULL EXAMPLE

CTS

You can use the @XmlValue annotation to map to Java class to a complex type with simple content.

@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class CTS {

    @XmlValue
    String ct;

}

P1

import java.util.List;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;

@XmlRootElement(name="P1")
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class P1 {

    @XmlElement(name = "CTS")
    List<CTS> cts;

}

Demo

import java.io.File;
import javax.xml.bind.*;

public class Demo {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        JAXBContext jc = JAXBContext.newInstance(P1.class);

        Unmarshaller unmarshaller = jc.createUnmarshaller();
        File xml = new File("src/forum13987708/input.xml");
        P1 p1 = (P1) unmarshaller.unmarshal(xml);

        Marshaller marshaller = jc.createMarshaller();
        marshaller.setProperty(Marshaller.JAXB_FORMATTED_OUTPUT, true);
        marshaller.marshal(p1, System.out);
    }

}

input.xml/Output

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<P1>
    <CTS>
        Hello
    </CTS>
    <CTS>
        World
    </CTS>
</P1>

For More Information

share|improve this answer

Two issues I can see:

1) You need to use P1.class in your JAXBContext. You haven't said what the Presentation class is, but if your root element is P1, that's what you need in the context:

JAXBContext jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance(P1.class);

2) You need to specify the name of the root xml element:

@XmlRootElement(name="P1")
public class P1 {
...
share|improve this answer
    
this is right . I have changed the variable name .forgot to change it in test class. –  Thinker Dec 21 '12 at 9:57
    
I can't reproduce your error because you haven't posted all the code. Do you have a method called cts() as well? If so, try renaming it to something else. –  dogbane Dec 21 '12 at 10:00
    
no.this is whole my code. There is only getter and setters other than this code. The error showing is because it has two cts in xml file –  Thinker Dec 21 '12 at 10:03
    
no, I have run the code you posted and it works for me. According to the error, you have two properties called cts in the class. It doesn't have anything to do with your xml. –  dogbane Dec 21 '12 at 10:05
    
code run without error in your system? –  Thinker Dec 21 '12 at 10:07

Your XML looks like this:

<P1>
  <CTS>
    Hello
  </CTS>
  <CTS>
    World
  </CTS>
</P1>

But considering your mapping it should look like:

<p1>
  <CTS>
    <CT>
    Hello
    </CT>
  </CTS>
  <CTS>
    <CT>
    World
    </CT>
  </CTS>
</p1>

In order to change root element from p1 to P1 use attribute name from @XmlRootElement.

If you want to parse the first version of XML you posted, change your P1 class like this:

@XmlRootElement(name="P1")
public class P1 {
    @XmlElement(name = "CTS")
    List<String> cts;
 }
share|improve this answer
1  
FYI - You can map the object model to the XML given by @Thinker by leveraging the @XmlValue annotation: stackoverflow.com/a/13988362/383861 –  Blaise Doughan Dec 21 '12 at 10:53
1  
Thank you Blaise for the tip! I wasn't aware about @XMLValue. –  Florin Dec 21 '12 at 12:35

You could try the following,

If you could, make xml as of the following structure.

<P1>
    <CTSList>
       <CTS value="Hello"/>
       <CTS value="World"/>
    </CTSList>
<P1>

And use,

@XMLRootElement(name="P1")
public class P1 {
  List CTSList;

  @XMLElementWrapper(name="CTSList")
  @XMLELement(name="CTS")
  public void setCTSList(List<CTS> ctsList) {
     this.CTSList = ctsList;
  }

  public List<CTS> getCTSList() {
    return this.CTSList;
  }
}

@XMLRootElement(name="CTS")
public class CTS {
   String cts;

   @XMLAttribute(name = "value")
   public String getCts() {
     return this.cts;
   }

   public void set setCts(String cts) {
     this.cts = cts;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
FYI - You can map the object model to the XML given by @Thinker by leveraging the @XmlValue annotation: stackoverflow.com/a/13988362/383861 –  Blaise Doughan Dec 21 '12 at 11:17

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